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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Robin Sharkey on 1st June, 2016 wrote of James Greenhalgh:

Launceston Examiner (Tasmania) ( June 1848 page 8
“The period for which the undermentioned persons were transported having expired, certificates to that effect have been granted them accordingly:
  -  James Greenhalgh, “Forfarshire”. “

Robin Sharkey on 1st June, 2016 wrote of James Greenhalgh:

Launceston Examiner (Tasmania) ( June 1848 page 8
“The period for which the undermentioned persons were transported having expired, certificates to that effect have been granted them accordingly:
  -  James Greenhalgh, “Forfarshire”. “

Robin Sharkey on 1st June, 2016 wrote of Thomas Greenhalgh:

THOMAS Greenhalgh, tried Lancaster, SALFORD Gaol Delivery on 23 May 1842. Then aged 25 yrs. Tried with James Wild (Who was transported one year later on “Forfarshire’ - see separate entry).
Per Ship indent:
Transported for ten years for “burglary and stealing 3/-”
Prosecutor was Abraham Wild and “James Wild -transported for this offence - was nephew to my prosecutor”
[Prior offences]  3 or 4 times for keeping a disorderly house; for assaults;  3 months, - 1 month - 6 days -  7 weeks & discharged for highway robbery.
Surgeon’s Report - Well behaved.
Remarks - 3 brothers - John, James, William, all Rochdale
One sister - Mary Anne (ditto)
5ft 6 inches, 25 years old. Protestant. Single.  “No” to read or write.  Trade - Shoemaker;  Native Place - Mildrew (??)

Was transported on 25 June 1842, only one month after trial.
UKCriminal Register, for Lancaster, Salford GD 23 May 1842, age 25. tried for burglary (listed immediately under James Wild), Sentence - transported for ten years.

Ticket of Leave for Thomas Greenhalgh per “Emily’” delivered in Augustt 1818 - per Launceston Examiner dated 5/8/1848, page 8

Robin Sharkey on 1st June, 2016 wrote of James Greenhalgh:

James Greenhalgh per “Forfarshire”, tried 23 May 1842 at Salford Gaol Delivery for stealing a watch. 

UK Criminal Register, Salford GD for Lancaster Assizes 23 May 1842, aged 38 yrs, Offence of Larceny, Can neither read or write.

Transported per “Forfarshire”  Indent records (at Image 30 of Tasmanian Archive records):
“Stealing a watch. Prosecutor at Manchester. I found the watch on the Birmingham railway”
“Prior Convictions:  illegally pledging: 6 mths /  picking pockets: 6 mths
Sentence at Lancaster, Salford to 7 years transportation.
Surgeons Report:  Very good [i.e. character]
Native Place: Manchester
5ft 7 inches. AGED 41 in 1843 ship record. Therefore born 1801
[ Note however UK Cromonal Register records age in 842 as only 38]
Family: Wife Ellen lives at Manchester. No children
Brother Thomas lives at the native place. Two sisters named Maria and Margaret.
Protestant. Occupation: Collier.

D Wong on 31st May, 2016 wrote of Michael Dineen:

Michael Dineen was 25 years old on arrival in VDL and was transported for “Drunkenness, mutiny and discharging my piece in the Barrack Room”.  He was once tried by a Regimental Court Martial for being absent without leave - flogged.

Michael was 5’9 ½” tall, fresh complexion, brown hair and whiskers, dark hazel eyes, single.

1835 Muster: Assigned to Mr. D. Gibson.

6/1/1842: TOL
16/12/1845: Recommended for a CP
October 1846: CP Approved.
December 1846: CP Extended to include all colonies.

No further records found in Tasmania, no departure found.

Nell Murphy on 31st May, 2016 wrote of John Thompson:

John Thompson was convicted at Northallerton for stealing shoes and boots. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the ‘Mandarin’ arriving 16 Oct 1843.

Aged 19yrs; single; shoemaker.
Native place - Newcastle upon Tyne

6mths Probation - at Broadmarsh.
Released from Probation 18 June 1845.
Discharged to his Freedom 8 Oct 1845.

Nell Murphy on 31st May, 2016 wrote of John Thompson:

n.b. There are two John Thompson’s on this voyage of the ‘Coromandel’ - this man is identifier (1).
John Thompson was convicted at Cumberland 27 June 1837 for stealing from the person - picking pockets. Previous offences and imprisoned before. 7yr transportation sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the ‘Coromandel arriving 1838.

Geniej on 31st May, 2016 wrote of Joseph Harrison:

The connection of this convict to Joseph Harrison who died in Bendigo in 1854, is confirmed by the mention of his convict status when Joseph Harrison was tried in 1852 for shooting at Margaret Barrett with intent to kill.  His Tasmanian convict past is mentioned in the dispositions of several witnesses.  Source: VPRS 30 at Public Record Office of Victoria

Robyn McNamara on 31st May, 2016 wrote of Henry Cleworth:

On April 6, 1835 Henry married Caroline Rose aka Rowles in Maitland.
According to the NSW Convict list for Caroline Rose aka Rowles #880, she had been convicted in a first offense in Bristol Quarter Sessions of Larceny and sentenced to 7 years transportation.

Caroline was one of 140 females who went on board the 323 ton convict bark Numa built in 1811 in Sunderland on 29 January 1834, sailing from Portsmouth. They travelled via the Cape and arrived in Sydney after 135 days at sea on 13 June 1834. There were two deaths on the trip. Caroline was sent to Newcastle.

On Caroline’s Ticket of Leave #39/1776 dated 5 September 1839 she is listed as prisoner 4/34 and states she was transported on the ship Numa in 1834 - Master Baker. Place of Trial Bristol Quarter Sessions on 14 October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation.
Caroline was allowed to remain in the district of Patricks Plains on the recommendation of the district Bench. Dated May 1839. For whatever reason, this was surrendered as noted on her Certificate of Freedom.

Caroline Rose aka Rowles’ Certificate of Freedom of 8 Feb 1842 #42/185 lists her being transported on the ship Numa in 1834 from Bristol. Her calling was a housemaid when she was sentenced at the Bristol Session on 14 Oct 1833. Caroline received 7 years.
Her year of birth was 1813, height 4’11¼”, complexion ruddy and freckled, hair dark brown, eyes chestnut. She had a scar on the inner corner of the right eyebrow and a scar on the little finger on the left hand. She held a Ticket of Leave #39/1776 dated 5 Sep 1839 which was surrendered.
Henry Cleworth, now free, was 38 when he received permission to marry bonded Caroline (aged 21) on 6 April 1835 in Maitland (#134).

Robyn McNamara on 31st May, 2016 wrote of Henry Cleworth:

Henry, aged 22 was listed in the Lancashire Quarter Sessions register p756 in the July Sessions in 1818 and charged with Larceny along with 21-year-old Hugh and 26-year-old William Davenport. They were sentenced to 7 years transportation. Hugh and William were sent on the Retribution on 4 Sep 1818.
The presence of a bill of costs, QSP/2739/227 confirms the trial was held at the Lancashire Quarter Sessions. The bill of costs itself is basically an expenses claim filed to recoup the costs of prosecution
Henry was taken from Lancaster prison and put onto the Bellerophon at Woolwich on 9th Sep 1818 with nine others. His records state he was aged 22 and had been convicted of a Felony at the Liverpool Assizes on 3rd August 1818. His estimated year of birth was 1796.

In the 1818 Convict Transportation Register Henry is listed as being convicted at the Lancaster Quarter Sessions on 3 Aug 1818 and sentenced to 7 years transportation.
Henry was transported on the Grenada (1), leaving London in May 1919 and travelling via Rio, arriving in Sydney on 21 October 1819 after 166 days at sea.
On his arrival Henry was quickly on the Col Secretary’s list of 30 Oct 1819 to sent, with 31 others from the Grenada and Atlas 4 to Emu Plains as part of the Agricultural Establishment, where they were assigned to farmers. They were forwarded by water to Parramatta and then by land to Liverpool. They were then to be forwarded “under proper charge of constables to the settlement of Emu Plains.”
On 22 Dec 1822 Henry was sent to the Orphan School Farm Clearing Party
The 1825 General Muster lists Henry Cleworth, per Grenada 1819, sentenced to 7 years, as a labourer at Parramatta.
Sources:
Repository Lancashire Archives
Level Item
Reference number QSP/2739/227
Title Bill of costs of prosecution of Henry Cleworth, Hugh Davenport and William Davenport
Date c1818
AccessStatus Open
http://archivecat.lancashire.gov.uk/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=Q/S/P/2739/227&pos=2

Sat 3 Apr 1819
Lancaster Gazette, p3
LANCASTER ASSIZES
“... Ralph Cleworth, at West Leigh, aud stealing 3 cwt. of weft Guilty.
Is this a brother?

Sat 28 Nov 1863
Yorkshire Gazette, p4
LAW INTELLIGENCE
“... Peter Cleworth, a farmer, who was convicted of making hay on Sunday, and the question was whether the act of Charles II, under which the conviction was made.

UK, Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849 about Henry Cleworth
Name:  Henry Cleworth
Age:  22
Estimated Birth Year:  abt 1796
Date Received:  9 Sep 1818
Ship:  Bellerophon
Place Moored:  Woolwich
Date Convicted:  3 Aug 1818
Place Convicted:  Liverpool

New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary’s Papers, 1788-1825 about Henry Clewerth
Name:  Henry Clewerth
Event Date:  30 Oct 1819
Arrival Year:  1819
Vessel:  Grenada
Event Description:  On list of convicts disembarked from the “Grenada” and forwarded to Emu Plains for distribution
Comments:  Per “Grenada”, 1819
Series:  (NRS 937) Copies of letters sent within the Colony, 1814-1825
Item:  4/3501
Page:  4

New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary’s Papers, 1788-1825 about Henry Clewerth
Name:  Henry Clewerth
Event Date:  22 Dec 1822
Arrival Year:  1819
Vessel:  Grenada
Event Description:  On return of convicts discharged from the Establishment, Emu Plains; to Orphan School Farm clearing party
Comments:  Per “Grenada”, 1819
Series:  (NRS 898) Special bundles, 1794-1825
Item:  2/8283
Page:  128

Steven Horton on 31st May, 2016 wrote of Mary Kennedy:

On 19th February 1851 Mary gave birth to a baby boy and placed him in a suitcase and threw him outside. A fellow servant heard cries and the baby was saved, but died the following morning.

Damien Williams on 30th May, 2016 wrote of Thomas Williams:

Employed as a labourer at Springfield, Capel for four years, from June 1863 to June 1867. Thomas Williams (convict no.5839) had been sentenced in 1859 to ten years for horse stealing. He had arrived on the Palmerston and was given his ticket of leave two years later. He was awarded a conditional pardon in October 1867.

I believe this is almost certainly the same Thomas Williams who married Elinor/Eleana/Elena Dilley on 2 March 1867 and settled in Capel, and died 19 February 1921. I believe his birth year was 1837 and not 1827 as indicated in the court and ship records. I remember sighting an image of the court record where the poorly formed ‘3’ in the year was mistaken as a ‘2’.

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of John Andrews:

John Andrews was convicted at Dorset for stealing 2 sacks of wheat. Previous offences - belonged to a “gang of thieves”. (Brother James Andrews was also convicted of stealing and transported on same ship to VDL.). 7yr sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the ship ‘Bengal Merchant’ 1828.

Single man. Stated he last worked for Abbott, near Blandford.
Father: Thomas Andrews, Dorset.
Brother: James Andrews (VDL)

No remarks on his Conduct Record in Colony.

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of James Andrews:

James Andrews was convicted at Dorset on 9 Jan 1827 for stealing a hive of bees. 3 previous convictions. 7yr transportation sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the ‘Bengal Merchant’ 1828.

His brother John Andrews was also transported on this ship for a similar offence.

Single man. I was last living with Lord Rivers’ Gamekeeper.
Father, Thomas Andrews at native place nr Cranbourne, Dorset. Works on farm for Mr. Davis.

Assignment of work service in Colony.
1829: Cawthorne - suspected of intention to rob his Mistress. Returned to Public Works, New Norfolk.

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of Abraham Aaron:

Abraham Aaron was convicted in London on 22 Oct 1823 for stealing silver instruments (called a Pointer in the Synagogue) and chain. 7yr transportation sentence. Stated he had a previous offence which also had a transportation sentence. (Not able to find details on Old Bailey records.) Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the ship ‘Phoenix’ arriving July 1824.

Single man; aged 17yrs; Jewish.
Native place - Hamstead, London.

1825: Port Arthur Penal Settlement. Out after hours and escaping from Constable. 50 lashes.
1825: Have in his possession a piece of silk. 25 lashes.
1825: Refused to work and insolent. 50 lashes.
1826: Improper conduct and neglect of duty in Barracks. 25 lashes.
1827: steal yarn from the cloth factory. 50 lashes.
1827: Disobey orders. 10 lashes.
1828: Felony. Committed for trial. Guilty. Death sentence.

Executed, Hobart Town, 1 Aug 1828.

Noted by the Jewish Society in Australia as being a very sad case of transportation and harsh treatment.

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of William Austen:

William Austin was convicted of horse stealing, at Kent on 7 Aug 1822. Previously convicted. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the ship ‘Phoenix’ 1824.

Single man.

No remarks on his Conduct Record in Colony other than to say he had died (no date given).

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of James Ahern:

James Ahern was transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ship ‘Dorothy’ 1820.

Aged 21yrs; stone setter apprentice.

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of Martin Gill:

Married Margaret McCormick/McCormack in Sydney 19 Sept 1831. St. Mary’s Roman Catholic church. Margaret had been transported for minor theft on the ship ‘Elizabeth’ 1828. (http://www.convictrecords.com.au/convicts/mccormick/margaret/133462)

Ticket of Leave granted 17 Jan 1827.

Martin Gill became a business man/hotelier and shop owner. The Gill’s had 12 children, but some died in infancy.

Martin is apparently not the brother of the Lawrence Gill who was also transported on this ship.
Martin’s father is stated to be Mathew Gill.

Electoral rolls for 1845 - 1850 have the family living at Pitt St. Sydney.

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of Margaret Mccormick:

Margaret McCormick/McCormack was convicted at Dublin in 1827 for stealing a handkerchief. 7yr sentence. Transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ship ‘Elizabeth’ 1828.

Single woman; aged 16yrs; servant; Roman Catholic.
Native place: Drogheda, Louth Co.
Parents: Thomas McCormick & Mary Reilly.

Assigned to work in Sydney, Australia.

Married Martin Gill (transported on the ship ‘Dorothy’ 1820 at St. Mary’s R.C. church, Sydney on 19 Sept 1831.

The Gill family ran shops and hotels in Sydney. It is believed they had up to 12 children but some died in infancy. They include:
Son William
Daughter Mary Ann (m. James Butler Kinchela & 2nd m. to Charles Augustus Beatty)
Son Thomas
Son Martin
Daughter Isabella

Margaret died of Bright’s disease aged 69yrs. She was buried, after a service in the church, at Corowa Cemetery. Margaret’s daughter Mary Ann (under name Beatty) is buried next to her.

Greg Webster on 30th May, 2016 wrote of Henry Dennis:

25 may 1852 was given a Ticket of Leave and on 1 jun 1852 was recommended for a Contifional Pardon.  He became a Constable in the Hamilton (Tasmania) area- Upper Derwent Valley. On 10 Jan 1853 he arrested a person James Nuttall and was charged with misconduct and sentenced to six months hard labour. He was granted a conditional discharge on 23 May 1854.  Married Mary Ann Brynes at Macquarie Plains on 13 Feb 1855. between 1861 and 1866 moved to the Westbury and Deloraine Districts - Northern Tasmania. His wife passed away from dysentery in 1870 - 4 Nov. he then married a bridget Connel at Deloraine in the Catholic church. At that time he was a farm labourer and she was a farm servant. He later went to live with on e of his son’s a Arthur who was a bookmaker living at ulverstone. There is an obituary in the newspaper 21 Jul 1910 (See TROVE website). there is also mention of him being a sexton at the Westbury Catholic church prior to this time. At time of death had six children but only four are named and only two Arthur and another son Leslie have been located both in the Ulverstone area.  He death certificate shows he was buried in the Catholic section of the Ulverstone cemetery.

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of Martin Gill:

Martin Gill was convicted at Dublin City 1820 for stealing iron griddles. 7yr sentence.
Transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ship ‘Dorothy’ 1820.

Aged 17yrs; silk weaver.
Native place: Dublin

Nell Murphy on 30th May, 2016 wrote of Laurence Gill:

Lawrence Gill was convicted for stealing a card of cloth.

A Lawrence Gill was also on board the ‘Dorothy’ but thought not to be his brother.

Tracey Kay on 29th May, 2016 wrote of Joseph Byrne:

Catherine & Joseph are my 4th Great Grandparents, they had 7 children as follows
James Byrne 1825–1899
John Byrne 1827–
Mary Byrne 1827–1849
James Byrne 1831–1916
Patrick Byrne 1831–1870
Michael Byrne 1835–1876
Myles Byrne 1866–1901

Scott Young on 29th May, 2016 wrote of William Saville:

TOL granted 10th june 1839

Scott Young on 29th May, 2016 wrote of Benjamin Savill:

conditional pardon granted 1851

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