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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

Goal: 100 500 1,500 3,310 New Convicts

A big thanks to everyone who contributed a convict - we reached our original target of 100 new convicts in less than a month, and have had an amazing 3,343 new convicts added in total!

Our current goal of 3,611 is special in that it means we will have discovered roughly 1 in 10 convicts who were missing from the original records!

If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 32,769 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

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Goal: 15,000 Contributions

By contributing you will bring the community a step closer to a goal of 15,000 contributions. We currently have 12,772 contributions.

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Recent Submissions

Maureen Garvey on 2nd March, 2015 wrote of Eliza Howis:

Eliza was transported with two children. Husband was not sent to Van Diemen’s land. One child, James, died on board of dysentery in 1851. Eliza sent to Cascades Female Factory. Permission to marry convict, Frederick Butler was granted. They married and had a further 11 children.

Heather Lee on 2nd March, 2015 wrote of Joseph Puckeridge:

Ann Maund & Joseph Puckeridge were married at St Marys Church at Earling in 1776.  St Marys Church is still standing today and is located on St Marys Rd, Earling, there is a painting of the original church within but the church has been extended so only the side walls remain and now the outside is very different.  Ann & Joseph went on to have a further six children, William, John, Ann, Mary Ann, Richard & Joseph.  William, the eldest child married Caroline Miles in 1842 and together they had 12 children.  I am unsure what happened to the remainiing siblings as I am decended from this line.

Bill Piper on 1st March, 2015 wrote of Margaret Maitland:

She was convicted of stealing from her employer in Stratford, London. In Hobart she married Isaac Lear, a free man who came to VDL with his mother and joined his brothers, all convicts. She became a respectable citizen of Hobart. In Tasmania, she was known as Margaret Christina Lear. Her death notice is in The Mercury of 9 Aug 1895

Keith South on 1st March, 2015 wrote of Edward Corrigan:

Native of Meath County, age 36, married with four children.

Bill Piper on 1st March, 2015 wrote of Margaret Maitland:

Margaret was convicted of stealing from her employer. In Hobart she married Isaac Lear, a free settler in a convict family.

Bill Piper on 1st March, 2015 wrote of Henry Hanger:

When he got his freedom he settled in the Picton area of NSW. he married Mary Dooling in Camden in 1850. He subsequently became a successful landowner and pastoralist. He and Mary are the antecedents of a large number of Australians.

Bill Piper on 1st March, 2015 wrote of James Giddings:

He was transported to NSW. However his wife, Anne,  and their sons travelled to VDL. When James got his freedom he joined them in Green Ponds (Kempton). He is buried in Kempton.

Brendan Reason on 1st March, 2015 wrote of Charles Bond:

Born Cold Ashby ,Northamptonshire,England
married 1853-1854 Oatlands,tasmania,Australia to
Ellenor ONIONS b ireland b abt 1816- d 1907 Oatlands,tasmania,Australi
transported 1849 . Came out on the ship ” Australasia “
Had one son and 5 daughters -4 living
photo of Ellenor Onions in the book ” A Drift of derwent Duck ” by Trudy Cowley

Brendan Reason on 1st March, 2015 wrote of George, Charles Montressor:

Lived at Oatlands,Tasmania ,Australia .
married Ellen WHELAN between 1861-1853 Oatlands,Tasmania ,Australia
had one daughter and two sons

Solar Phil on 1st March, 2015 wrote of John Morray:

Was a hotel licensee at the “Constitution” Lothian St, Hotham, until his death in 1866.  His wife Mary, carried on the license for another year.
He is buried in Melbourne General Cemetery.

Geraldine on 1st March, 2015 wrote of Dutton Clarke:

Dutton married Mary Selwin at Maysey Hampton, Gloucestershire, 25 February 1815.

Geoff Castle on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Charles Cooke:

Great Grandfather to my mother betty may kramer

D Wong on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Priscilla O'connor:

Priscilla was 19 years old on arrival (although the Old Bailey trial has her age as 28) and she was transported for ‘Stealing from her master’.

Priscilla was 4’11” tall, her native place was Connaught, Ireland, she was very much freckled, dark brown hair, hazel eyes.

25/10/1844: Married William Mayo (Aurora 1835) and had 3 children.
William b 20/2/1850
Jane b 10/1/1852
Jane b 29/7/1854

and the death of Jane aged 2 from croup on 17/5/1856.

11/11/1845: TOL
26/4/1849: Certificate.

D Wong on 28th February, 2015 wrote of William Mayo:

William was 18 years old on arrival and was transported for ‘Stealing a watch’ from a dwelling house.

William was 5’6” tall, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, fresh complexion, MM inside right arm, several moles on each arm, he could read and was protestant.
Single - Chance child.

Father: Richard at Upley, a labourer.
Brothers: Thomas, William, George, Joseph.
Sisters: Lucy, Anna, ???

13/10/1843: TOL
17/11/1846: Recommended for CP
1/7/1848: CP

25/10/1844: Married Priscilla O’Connor (Royal Admiral 1842)at Launceston, he was 22 and she was 21.
They had William b 20/2/1850
Jane b 10/1/1852 at Morven
and
Jane b 29/7/1854.
Jane died 17/5/1856, aged 2 of croup.

1858: William was a farmer at Camperdown, Tas.

No date of death found.

Carolyn Mason on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Susan Gage:

Married (1) William Dockrell or Dockerell in Australia
(2) Charles Samuel Cave in Australia, Jul 1825

Fran Taylor on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Alfred Trott:

Alfred’s wife, Anne Coote first married Thomas Crowd, another convict, 1859 at Picton Church, they had four children.  Thomas died in 1868 and Anne then married Alfred Trott in 1869 in Albany.  Anne’s sister, Sarah, was married to John Mottram of Manjimup. (Beverley Mottram)

Richard Forrester on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Thomas Weekley:

Convicted of theft of ‘size of beef’ and due to previous theft conviction in Oct 1829 is sentenced to transportation.
Obtained Ticket of Leave in 7 April 1840. Married Honora Regan who arrived Australia 1832 aboard Red Rover.

Robin Sharkey on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Thomas Dooley:

Thomas Dooley was only 22 years old when guilty in Surry and given life transportation.  He was a native of Kildare.
Tall-ish at 5ft 10 inches, black hair, grey eyes and of pale complexion.

On arrival he was assigned to the farm of John Redmond on arrival on “Fanny” in January 1816.  Also at the farm in 1816 was Michael Ryan, (hard to tell which of the many this was).

Tom was hanged before the year was out.
He happily went along on an expedition on Saturday 30th Sept 1816 to rob the farm of John Miller -  led by Colin Hunter, who, with George Fuller, had decided to call in to Redmond’s Farm on the way and see if Michael Ryan and Dooley would like to assist.

Dooley apparently had a taste for breaking the law; he didn’t tell them to go away and just go to the pub instead.

When there at Miller’s farm, Colin Hunter went in first, with the others close behind, but shot dead John Miller as he rose from his chair in front of the fireplace with his wife and four children in the room.  They all four then proceeded with the plan to rob the house. This only aggravated their circumstances when they were brought to trial

1 November 1816 Trial at Criminal Court.  George Fuller gave evidence for the Crown, thereby ensuring his own immunity and continued existence in the world. The other four were found guilty and sentenced to hang in the usual way, on the following Monday.

Three days later, on Monday 4th November, Tom Dooley spent the time on the way to his execution in prayer with his co-accused thereby earning the approval of the Sydney Gazette for his appropriate demeanour.  His body, and those of the others, was given over for dissection to the Colonial Surgeons.

Robin Sharkey on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Colin Hunter:

1800 Porpoise in 1800 - Was a soldier with 61st regiment. Tried at the Cape for Sodomy. (No details of sentence given)
1806 - Employed by John Bishop who had a 30 acre grant and 8 acres by purchase at Mulgrave Place, employed with one other FbyS man (perhaps not free as he claimed)
1808 Notice in Sydney Gazette 17 July 1808 - had absconded from the farm of Thomas Rickerby at the Hawkesbury, as a servant of the Crown.
1809, September - was sailing out on “Star” on a sealing voyage
1812 ( 21 December) To go to Newcastle on “Estramina, sentenced at the Governor’s pleasure.  ESCAPED:
1813, 20 March - to 8 May 1813 advertisements Sydney Gazette - had absconded from Newcastle
1813,  May - evidently recaptured
1813 2 June On “Estramina” to Newcastle again. Specifically for a term of 3 years, sentenced by the Governor on 1st June 1813.

1816,  after sentence has expired, was ranging the bush. He has hooked up with George Fuller who had escaped from his master’s service at Windsor by August 1816, and was wanted for highway robbery. In other words Fuller was probably living in the bush and occasionally robbing to survive.

30 September 1816 - Robbery and Murder.  Hunter and Fuller decided to rob the house of John Miller, 4 miles from Sydney. On the way there they collected two more current convicts from the farm of John Redmond - Michael Ryan and Thomas Dooley - to join in with them.  At the farmhouse on that Saturday night, John Miller, his wife and four children were in the room, relaxing in front of the fireplace when the men burst in.  Miller went to rise from his chair and Colin Hunter shot him immediately with his gun, killing him on the spot.  The men continued on their purpose of robbing the house.

George Fuller on turning himself in offered to go King’s evidence and on Friday 1st November 1816 he told the Criminal Court the full story.  The other three men, Hunter included, were found guilty of murder and robbery and were all sentenced to death.

4 November 1816 - The three were hanged the next Monday, 4th November 1816. The Sydney Gazette of 9 November 1816, approved of their deportment on the way to their execution since they engaged themselves in prayer on the way. Colin Hunter’s body and that of his comrades remained suspended for an hour and then were sent for dissection.

D Wong on 28th February, 2015 wrote of William Camage:

1843: TOL - Goulburn - Listed as Carnage.

Married Catherine Smith and had 5 children.
Catherine B22/11/1822 in County Cavan, Ireland - Died 17/4/1877 at Braidwood.

Roma Joyce on 28th February, 2015 wrote of William Mayo:

I have that he married Priscella O Connor and had a son on the 20 Feb 1850 named William & they had a daughter Jane born 10 Jan 1852
Son William came to Victoria

D Wong on 28th February, 2015 wrote of Patrick Marmion:

Patrick was tried in April 1791 at the Assizes in Downpatrick, where he was presented as
… a vagabond by the Grand Jury, was found guilty and ordered for transportation.

He escaped in 1792 but retaken, convicted 21 Mar 1794 & sentenced to be transported for 7 years 27 Mar 1795.

In 1798: Marmion lived with Catherine Evans from Dublin, who had arrived per ‘Royal Admiral’ 1972.  They had 4 children.

Colonial Secretary Papers:
MARMON, Patrick. Per “Marquis Cornwallis”, 1796
1810 Mar Remuneration received by while employed in building of new Commissariat Stores (Reel 6042; 4/1723 pp.202-3)
1811 Feb 8 Enquiry into his sentence of transportation resulted in his being given a certificate of freedom; appears as Marmion (Reel 6043; 4/1726 pp.211-2)
1816 Jul 19 Juror at inquest on Michael Scandlin held at Sydney (Reel 6021; 4/1819 p.627)
1816 Jul 19 Re evidence at inquest on Michael Scandlin (Reel 6021; 4/1819 p.629)
1822 Jun 10 On list of persons receiving an assigned convict (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D p.78)
From John Thomas Campbell, Secretary to Governor Macquarie; Provost Marshal
1811 Feb 8 Memo re alteration to records relating to Patrick Marmion, a political prisoner (Reel 6043; 4/1726 pp.211-2)

Certificate of freedom granted 1811.

1828 census he was aged 75 & living as a stonemason at Lower Portland Head NSW

From Irish Wattle:
The Hero of Waterloo, a grand old pub in the Rocks area of Sydney, has always had a nefarious past. Built in 1843, it was a favourite haunt of the Garrison Troops, and used for rum smuggling.
But research by Barbara Hall shows that even before The Hero was built, the parcel of land on which it stands in Lower Fort Street was garnering an infamous history by association.
It was first granted by Governor Lachlan Macquarie to 57-year-old Irish convict Patrick Marmion in 1814. Patrick had been a prisoner in Sydney since his arrival in 1796 aboard the Marquis Cornwallis.

Standing at 5ft 9in, Patrick was broad of face and shoulder, with blond hair. Known as Captain Marmion to his friends as well as enemies, Patrick was leader to some 300 republican rebels in County Down, Ireland, during the late 1780s. It was this career that led to his transportation. The year after his arrest and conviction in 1791 he escaped from goal, wearing a drab-coloured coat, black waistcoat and old corduroy breeches. Patrick was recaptured shortly after and re-imprisoned ready for transportation to New South Wales.

Patrick laboured in Sydney for a number of years before being granted his 13 perches at 81 Lower Fort Street. A stonemason by trade, he was often paid in rum and food from the government stores. It’s very possible that he built a house on the block, but this is not known for sure. He sold the land to a Mrs Leighton a few years later. It was then sold in 1842 for £350.

Karl Voigt on 28th February, 2015 wrote of William Kangaroo:

Gloucestershire Chronicle 01 Jul 1834, William Kangaroo and two others, arrested for assault and menacing at Stow-On-The-Wold
Convicted 13 Oct 1834
Bound over at Chatham 22 Oct 1834 for transport
Sailed 23 Mar 1835
Arrived Australia 5 Jul 1835

D Wong on 27th February, 2015 wrote of William Yardley:

From: http://www.historyaustralia.org.au/twconvic/3273

William was stationer when he was arrested at the age of 28. His accomplice, John Le Ross?, a jackhitt (sic) maker, was aged 34. William and John were both sentenced to death for the burglary of a linen draper’s shop at 36 Blackman Street, Southwark in south London. They were both reprieved to transportation for life a few days after their initial sentencing. In an appeal against his sentence William stated that he had a wife and elderly father to care for. He further claimed that the evidence against him had been fabricated as he had spent the evening in question (7 October 1785) entertaining a prostitute - Elizabeth WALLIS. Elizabeth swore that she had been drinking with William at the Admiral Vernon public house in London and had spent the night in bed with him. Several other witnesses corroborated that evidence. The trial judge discounted William’s alibi on the basis that other witnesses had reported seeing him and his accomplice John Le Ross? at the scene of the crime as well as the fact that his alibi was supported by testimony from a “common prostitute”.

August 1788 - William was transferred from county gaol to the ‘Ceres’ hulk at Langstone Harbour, Portsmouth.
30 November 1789 - Embarked on the ‘Surprise’ transport
1793 - William was cohabiting with Catherine EDWARDS? from at least this year.
June 1797 - Granted 30 acres at Seven Hills. William lived on this grant until about 1801.
July 1797 - Received a Conditional Pardon.
1800 - William was mustered as having 15 of his 30 acres cleared and cultivated, owning 15 pigs and having a wife and two children on-stores
1801 - Received a grant of land, larger than his Seven Hills grant, at Lower Portland in the Hawkesbury region of NSW
August 1804 - William’s 130 acre land grant was registered at Sussex Reach.
March 1805 - William advertised for sale his Seven Hills farm, eventually selling it to Thomas JONES on 22 June for £35 down with another £35 top be paid within ten months or the land to be resold

8 December 1805 - The Sydney Gazette printed a report on an inquest into William YARDLEY’s death at his farm. The Hawkesbury District coroner reported that he had been burned to death in a house fire which was assumed to have been started by a lightning strike. His wife and children had escaped but he was trapped inside while trying to save some clothing

March 1806 - William’s widow and their convict servant were arrested under suspicion of murdering him and concealing the crime by burning the body in the house. William’s body was exhumed and a head wound (covered by a handkerchief, was discovered on the body and Catherine was, for the following few weeks, subjected to intensive questioning over William’s death.

5 April 1806 - Both Catherine and the servant were released from custody when it was determined that there was insufficient evidence to mount a prosecution.

Sydney Gazette Sun 8 Dec 1805
On Thursday a Coroner’s Inquest assembled at Hawkesbury on the body of William Yardley, a settler down the River, whose death was was occasioned by the following melancholy
circumstances: A considerable time after himself and family were in bed Wednesday night, the house took fire, and burned with such rapidity as to render their escape difficult: he succeeded nevertheless, with his wife’s assistance, in snatching his children from the flames, and then unhappily returned to save some little cloathing, but the roof falling in, he perished in the attempt. The body of the deceased presented a ghastly spectacle to the jurors, whose verdict was appropriate to the event. As the accident of the house taking fire was most unaccountable and mysterious, many people attributed it to the lightning, which was very vivid at the time; but it is a much more probable conjecture that the disaster originated in the rancour of the Branch natives, to whose excesses his activity was a constant curb, and whose hostile inclinations are as manifest as ever. So long as they content themselves with pillaging the settlers’ grounds they experience civility and hospitable treatment: but tiring with this comparative moderation, they rush into acts of open and declared hostility; and it is much to be lamented that possibly from the want of sufficient caution, the first objects of their treachery have too frequently become its easy victims.

D Wong on 27th February, 2015 wrote of Catherine Edwards:

Catherine was 28 years old on arrival and had a child John Edwards aged 2 who arrived on the same ship, he died 24/10/1791 at Rose Hill.

In 1792 Catherine gave birth to a child Thomas Driscoll Edwards, 24th January 1792. It is believed that whilst pregnant with Thomas, Catherine was one of several convicts that escaped the Colony and tried to walk to China (which they believed was just North of Port Jackson). They were re-captured and returned to Rose Hill. Baby Thomas died 7th May 1792.

7/11/1796: Married William Yardley at Parramatta.
At that time William had land at Toongabbie but not long after they moved to the Hawkesbury area.

Sydney Gazette Sun 8 Dec 1805
On Thursday a Coroner’s Inquest assembled at Hawkesbury on the body of William Yardley, a settler down the River, whose death was was occasioned by the following melancholy
circumstances: A considerable time after himself and family were in bed Wednesday night, the house took fire, and burned with such rapidity as to render their escape difficult: he suceeded nevertheless, with his wife’s assistance, in snatching his children from the flames, and then unhappily returned to save some little cloathing, but the roof falling in, he perished in the attempt. The body of the deceased presented a ghastly spectacle to the jurors, whose verdict was appropriate to the event. As the accident of the house taking fire was most unaccountable and mysterious, many people attributed it to the lightning, which was very vivid at the time; but it is a much more probable conjecture that the disaster originated in the rancour of the Branch natives, to whose excesses his activity was a constant curb, and whose hostile inclinations are as manifest as ever. So long as they content themselves with pillaging the settlers’ grounds they experience civility and hospitable treatment: but tiring with this comparative moderation, they rush into acts of open and declared hostility; and it is much to be lamented that possibly from the want of sufficient caution, the first objects of their treachery have too frequently become its easy victims.

Catherine was tried for the murder of William and was found not guilty.

After his death it is believed that Catherine remained on their farm with her three children Edward 1794, Ruth 1797 and Mary 1799.

By 1814 Edward had left home. Ruth married Richard Hayman (Pitt) 21st June 1813 and Mary married Thomas Dent 14/8/1815. Later Catherine lived with her daughter Ruth who was estranged from Richard Hayman her husband.

Catherine was murdered on 14th October 1818 in the Sackville/Colo area near Laws Farm Road. She had suffered a violent blow to the head. Her son in law Richard Hayman was charge for her murder and stood trial in Sydney on 4th December He was found to be not guilty.

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