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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Philip Brown on 23rd July, 2016 wrote of William Taperell:

see FamilySearch FamilyTree for historical records.

Tony Cocks on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of William Dunn:

William Dunn was probably born c1830 in the Parish of St.Lukes in the London Borough of Finsbury and in 1841, according to the England Census of that year, was still living there with his Father and Mother, William and May, and his 2 Brothers and 2 Sisters. (1)

Nothing is known of his early life history until he was summoned to appear at the Middlesex (Clerkenwell) Quarter Sessions on 05/04/1842 accused of “Simple Larceny”, found guilty and sentenced to transportation for 7 years.  Then aged 12 he had been employed as a Labourer.  He was initially received at Cold Bath Fields Prison as part of the standard holding arrangements and then, on 04/11/1842, transferred to Parkhurst Prison.  His Gaoler’s Report commented that his character was regarded as “Bad”, that he was single but there was no indication as to whether or not he could read and write.  He was discharged from Parkhurst Prison on 13/04/1844 and sent to Millbank Prison , presumably categorised as “incorrigible” (that is, incapable of reform) and therefore to be transported as an adult convict.(2)

He sailed from the Downs Channel on the East coast of Kent on 17/05/1844 aboard the “Barossa”, disembarking at Hobart on 06/09/1844.(3)  The Surgeon for the voyage, John Gannon, also reported that he was “Bad” and had been flogged both earlier at Parkhurst Prison and on board the “Barossa”.(4)

After disembarkation his Station of Gang was Point Puer, where he was to serve a probationary period of twelve months.  Point Puer, a similar establishment to Parkhurst Prison, had been in operation since December 1833 as part of, but physically separate from, the Port Arthur adult convict complex.  His Conduct Record at Point Puer contains no entries until:

        William Dunn died at Point Puer on 25/08/1845 “His death
        occasioned by the fall of a tree.(5)

Notes:

(1):  1841 England Census, National Archives, HO107/667/2, pp.26,27.

(2):  Parkhurst Prison Register, The National Archives, HO24/15, p.21

(3):  Australian Convict Transportation Registers – Other Fleets & Ships, 1791-
      1868, Ancestry.co.uk (On-line database).  See also: McClelland, James, A
      Guide to the Convict & Pioneer Records of Tasmania, Gunnedah, (1994).

(4):    Conduct Record, Archives Office of Tasmania, CON33/59.

(5):    Ibid

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of James Pettit:

James Pettit was convicted at Maidstone, UK. Life sentence. Transported to NSW, Australia per the ‘Almorah’ 1817 then transferred to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Pilot’.
Ship’s report: “very good man”

Aged 36yrs; butcher; black hair; dark complexion; Hazel eyes; 5’9”.
Native Place: Kent, England.

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Thomas Franklin:

Thomas Franklin convicted at London 12 July 1816 was transported to New South Wales per the ‘Almorah’ 1817 then transferred to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania), Australia per the ‘Pilot’.
Ship’s report: well behaved.

Aged 34yrs; seaman. 5’6”; complexion - American black; black hair; black eyes.
Native place: Baltimore, America.

Van Diemen’s Land:
9 April 1818: Taking a Govt boat from moorings without leave. To work for Govt one week in his own time.
6 Dec 1819: Drunk. To work for Govt one week in his own time.
7 Feb 1820: Break, enter and steal from a dwelling. 200 lashes and to be sent for 3yrs to Newcastle, NSW.

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Francois Caillot:

Francois Caillot was convicted at Jersey, UK 16 Sept 1836 for murder - stated he “shot his wife in a fit of jealousy”. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Sarah’ arriving 29 Mar 1837.

Married, 2 or 4 children. Aged 54yrs; shoe/boot maker; 5’1 1/2”.
Native Place - St. Giles

Assignments in the Colony.
14 Oct 1837: In a public house out of hours. Reprimand.
24 Apr 1840: misconduct. Reprimand.
18 Mar 1845: Ticket of Leave granted.
5 Oct 1847: Conditional Pardon approved.

Application for permission to marry:
31 May 1845 - to Jane GEORGE. Approved, subject to clergyman’s approval.  Not recorded on index as a Marriage. (?)

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Francois Francois:

Family:
Father - Palite
Mother - Lronore
Brother - Amile
Sister - Marie Louise

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Francois Francois:

Francois was convicted at Port Louis, Mauritius on 23 March 1843 for stealing. 7yr transportation sentence. It is thought the ‘Waterwitch’ actually went to Port Adelaide, South Australia and then he was transferred to Van Diemen’s Land per the ‘Joseph Albino’ arriving 1 Oct 1843.

Aged 18yrs; labourer and bullock driver; 5’1 1/4”; black complexion; black hair; Hazel eyes; Roman Catholic.
Native Place - Port Louis, Mauritius.

12mths Probation Period - at Wedge Bay
10 April 1847: Ticket of Leave granted
27 Feb 1849: at Hobart - misconduct, being absent from his authorised residence. 3mths imprisonment with hard labour.
23 Mar 1850: Free Certificate

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Maria Martha Simonette:

Maria Simonette was convicted at Port Louis, Mauritius 9 July 1839 for assassinating a man named Arnie. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the Waterwitch arriving 19 Dec 1839.

Married woman, 4 children. Husband and children at Port Louis.

18 Feb 1845: Ticket of Leave granted.

Daughter Dolphinia Simonetta. Placed in St. Johns Orphanage, New Town (nr Hobart) - as was the requirement. Aged 3yrs, Admitted 5 Aug 1845. Died 11 May 1847 (inflammation of the heart). Buried St. John’s Cemetery, New Town.

14 June 1853: Drunk. Fined 5/-.

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Allen Airey:

Son Richard AIREY:
Marriage -
AIREY - QUIRK.-On 7th May 1883 by special license, at the Church of the Apostles, by the Rev. P. Gleeson, Richard Ernest Airey, to Mary B. Quirk, native of Ballinasloe, Ireland. (Ref. Launceston Examiner 12 June 1883)

Child of son Thomas Airey:
AIREY. —On the 18th August, at her residence,
Launceston, the wife of Thomas A. Airey
of a son. Both doing well. (Ref. Daily Telegraph, Launceston 21 Aug 1883)

Airey— Death - At his parent’s residence, West street, on the 5th March, Walter Allen, infant son of Thomas Allen and Sarah Elizabeth Airey, aged seven months. (Ref. Daily Telegraph 7 Mar 1884)

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Allen Airey:

Son Thomas Allen AIREY:
Marriage -
AIREY-CAREY.-On the 9th May 1881, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Victoria-street,by the Rev. C. Anthony, Thomas Allen,second son of Mr A. Airey, to Sarah Elizabeth,eldest daughter of Mr J. Carey. (Ref. Launceston Examiner 10 May 1881)

Nell Murphy on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Allen Airey:

Daughter Rebecca Airey:
Marriage - 25 June 1877
COCKER-AIREY. — On the 25th June, at Evandale, by the Rev. Robert S. Duff, M.A., John Cocker, of Cowley Hill, near Evandale, to Rebecca, eldest daughter of Mr Allen Airey, of Mount Pleasant, near Launceston. (Ref. Cornwall Chronicle 6 Jul 1877).

Yvonne Muscat on 22nd July, 2016 wrote of Elizabeth Williams:

Elizabeth married Thomas Brooks. They were my 2nd great grandparents through their daughter Anna Maria.

Tony Cocks on 21st July, 2016 wrote of Allen Airey:

AIREY, Allen

Convicted:      Lancaster (Preston) General Sessions
Date:            04/12/1846
Age:              13
Occupation:    Factory Boy
Offence:          Stealing knves
Sentence:        Transportation 7 years
Classification:  Success (absorbed into colonial society)

Allen Airey was born c1833 in Burnley, Lancashire, the son of Robert and Rebecca Airey and brother to Richard, William, Emanuel, Rebecca and Susannah.(i)

Nothing is known of his early life history until he was committed to appear at the Lancaster (Preston) General Sessions on 04/12/1846 accused of “Stealing knives”, found guilty and sentenced to 7 years transportation.  Then aged 13 he had been employed as a Factory Boy.  He was initially received at Millbank Prison as part of the standard interim holding arrangements and later, on 13/02/1847, transferred to Parkhurst Prison, where his Gaoler’s Report commented that he had been before convicted “Once theft”, was single and could read and write imperfectly.  He was discharged from Parkhurst Prison on 01/04/1850 in readiness for transportation to Van Diemen’s Land.(ii)

He sailed from Plymouth to Van Diemen’s Land aboard the “Blenheim” as a Ticket of Leave on 10/04/1850, eventually disembarking at Hobart on 24/07/1850.(iii)  His standard Conduct Record diarises his subsequent behaviour over the next 3 years:

    30/07/1850:  Prisoners’ Barracks Hobart.

    11/09/1850:  Transferred to the Depot Launceston.

    07/11/1850:  Officially granted his Ticket of Leave.

    13/01/1851:  Morven:  Neglect of duty: Reprimanded.

    12/04/1851:  Morven:  Misconduct in not attending at the Police Office when
                              ordered: Three months imprisonment and hard labour at
                              Launceston.

    29/12/1853:  Longford:  Certificate of Freedom.(iv)

Just over six months later on 13/07/1854 it appears Allen Airey sailed to Melbourne from Launceston as a passenger aboard the “Black Swan”.(v) 

He married 22 year old Bridget Nowlem according to the “Rites and Ceremonies of the Church of Scotland” at Berry Bank in the Wardy Yallock District of Victoria on
24/01/1855.(vi)  The continuing records are then slightly confusing in that the Archives Office of Tasmania indicate that he married Amelia Nolan in Westbury, Tasmania, in 1857.(vii)  This, however, must in part be a clerical error, Nolan for Nowlem, although both Bridget and Amelia are possibly correct as the registration in Westbury, Tasmania, of the birth of their first child, Rebecca, on 29/12/1855, shows Rebecca’s mother to be “Nolan Bridget Amelia”.(viii)

Unfortunately there are no records of how and when Allen and Bridget returned to Tasmania.

The family grew over the years with the addition of another 6 children:                                 
   
    An unnamed son born 28/12/1856;
    Thomas Allan 08/12/1860;
    Amelia 10/12/1862;
    Emanuel 20/01/1865;
    Richard 07/06/1867: and
    Hollie 07/09/1869.(ix)

Little else has been retrieved for Allen Airey, except to learn that in 1870 he was continuing to live in Westbury, renting a house with 2 acres of land at William Street, a property administered by the Executors of the late Thomas Gillam (x)  By 1887 he had moved to Garfield Street in Launceston.(xi) 

Allen Airey died aged 89
 
           
Notes:

(i):    Indent, Archives Office of Tasmania, CON14-1-33, Image Nos.156, 157 (On-line
      21/12/2008).

(ii):  Parkhurst Prison Register, The National Archives, HO24/15, p.64

(iii):  QSearch – Tasmanian Convict Records [CD-ROM].

      NB:  The website Convicts to Australia details the voyage
              of the Convict Ship “Blenheim” at the following link:
              http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/park18.html 

(iv):  Conduct Record, Archives Office of Tasmania, CON33-1-95, Image No: 4,
      (On-line 21/12/2008).                                 
     
(v):  Departures, Archives Office of Tasmania, (On-line 22/12/2008)

(vi):  Marriage Certificate No. 694, Public Record Office of Victoria.  See also Digger –
      Victoria Pioneer Index 1836-1888, [CD-ROM].

(vii):  Colonial Tasmanian Family Links, Archives Office of Tasmania, (On-line
      22/12/2008).

(viii): Digger – Tasmanian Pioneer Index 1803-1899, [CD-ROM].

(ix):  Ibid.

(x):  http://www.worldvitalrecords.com

(xi):  Ibid

Tony Cocks on 21st July, 2016 wrote of Alexander Agar:

AGAR, Alexander

Convicted:      Westminster City General Sessions
Date:            29/03/1843
Age:              14
Occupation:    Labourer
Offence:          Stealing a handkerchief
Sentence:        Transportation 10 years
Classification:  Success (absorbed into colonial society as a free citizen)
                           
Alexander Agar was born c1829 probably in London.

Nothing is known of his childhood and early life prior to his being summoned to appear at the Westminster City General Sessions on 29/03/1843 accused of “Stealing a handkerchief”, found guilty and sentenced to 10 years transportation.  Aged 14 he had apparently been employed as a Labourer.  He was first sent to Westminster Bridewell as part of the normal holding arrangements and then, on 18/07/1843, transferred to Parkhurst Prison.  His initial Gaoler’s report commented that he was “Quiet, Orderly”, was single but not recorded whether or not he could read and write.(i)  During his imprisonment he was taught the shoemaking trade , it was confirmed that he could both read and write and according to the Parkhurst Prison Goverrnor he was “Generally good – does not always speak the truth”.(ii)  On 01/01/1847 he was discharged from Parkhurst Prison in readiness for transportation to the Port Phillip District of the Colony of New South Wales as an “Exile”, that is, he would be entitled to a Conditional Pardon immediately upon arrival.(iii)

Alexander Agar eventually sailed aboard the “Thomas Arbuthnot” on 11/01/1847 as disembarking at Williamstown in the Port Phillip District on 04/05/1847.  His disposal was marked “Not specified.”(iv)

There is then approximately a 7 year interval before further information on his life history becomes available.  This is not uncommon.  Quite a few of the Parkhurst “Exiles” became Shepherds, Domestic Servants on outback properties or went gold prospecting and as there were no prescriptive “monitoring” arrangements requiring records invariably a marriage is a normal point of re-emergence in tracing terms.  In the case of Alexander Agar it was the birth of his first child, Alexander, on 23/10/1854 in Melbourne that marked his re-emergence.(v)

Although no confirmation has been retrieved it appears that Alexander Agar married Catherine Collins sometime prior to 1854 as she is referred to as Catherine Agar on the birth of Alexander above.  She had arrived in Melbourne on 14/05/1849 aboard the “Pemberton” as part of the Irish Famine Orphans Scheme, aged 14 and born in Limerick, and had been employed by Mrs. Cadden, Post Office, Melbourne, as an apprentice at £5 p.a.(vi)  The family history shows that 3 other children were born to the couple besides Alexander:

(1) Catherine in 1860;

(2)  Edward William in 1862 but died in 1863: and                    

(3)  Frederick William in 1864.

Alexander Agar died in 1904 aged 78 in Brunswick, Victoria, although his wife, Catherine, had pre-deceased him very early in 1874 aged 38.(vii)
                                     
                                             

      .

Notes:

(i):  Parkhurst Prison Register,  The National Archives, HO24/15, p.27.

(ii)  Keith M. Clarke, Convicts of the Port Phillip District, Waramanga
      (ACT), 1999, p.1 of 111 in the Section Exiles to Port Phillip 1844-1849.
     
      NB:  A large amount of the Parkhurst Prison information can be
            substantiated by reviewing the website “Convicts to Australia”
            http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/park8.html which
            deals with the convict ship “Thomas Arbuthnot”.

(iii):  TNA, HO24/15

(iv):  Keith M. Clarke

(v):  Digger – Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 (Year 1998), [CD-ROM].

(vi):  http://www.irishfaminememorial.org/orphans/ships_vic.htm

(viii):  Digger – Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 (Year 1998), [CD-ROM]

Richard Ward on 21st July, 2016 wrote of Samuel Rawson:

Born. Winkburn, Nottinghamshire, England

Died. Brisbane Valley, Oberon, New South Wales,

Garth McDonald on 21st July, 2016 wrote of William Hendry:

William Hendry had a child to Frances Johnson ( nee Pratt)
The Son was named Henry Thomas Johnson.(1831-1885)
Henry was raised by Frances Spurway( Johnson) and George Spurway, after their marriage in April 1835

Garth McDonald on 21st July, 2016 wrote of George Spurway:

His first child to Frances Johnson( nee Pratt) was in 1834.
Born George (1834- 1835). Aged 4 and a half months.
Buried in an unmarked grave at St Johns church Parramatta NSW

Tony Cocks on 21st July, 2016 wrote of William Morris:

MORRIS, William

Convicted:      Central Criminal Court (Old Bailey)
Date:            03/04/1843
Age:              14
Occupation:    Labourer
Offence:        Larceny and previous conviction of Felony
Sentence:        Transportation 7 years

William Morris was born c1829 in Paddington, London the son of John Horatio and Mary Morris and brother to John, Anne, Sophy, Elizabeth and Ellen.(i)

Little else is known of his early life history until he was summoned to appear at the Central Criminal Court (Old Bailey) on 03/04/1843 accused of “Larceny and previous conviction of Felony”, found guilty and sentenced to transportation for 7 years.  Then aged 14 the Court recorded that apparently he had been employed as a Labourer (A transcript of the trial proceedings is provided in the Appendix).  He was initially received at the Newgate Gaol as part of the interim standard holding arrangements, and then, on 29/06/1843, transferred to Parkhurst Prison.  His Gaoler’s Report commented that he had been “Before convicted”, was single, though there was no indication whether or not he could read and write (His documentation in Van Diemen’s Land confirmed that he could both read and write and that on release from the prison his character and disposition were described as “Good”.(ii)).  He was discharged from Parkhurst Prison on 25/07/1845 and sent to Millbank Prison, presumably categorised as “incorrigible”, that is, ineligible for transportation as an “Apprentice” to Western Australia, and therefore to be treated as a normal adult convict (This somewhat contradicts the character assessment referred to immediately above of “Good”).(iii) 

He sailed from London aboard the “Stratheden” on 03/08/1845 disembarking at Hobart, Van Diemen’s Land, on 25/12/1845.(iv)  The Surgeon during the voyage, Henry Baker, reported in William Morris’s Conduct Record that his behaviour was “Good”.(v)  The document confirms that his immediate status was as a Probation Pass Holder 2nd Class and then continues describing his subsequent behaviour under colonial servitude:

    10/01/1846:  New Town Depot.

    26/05/1846:  Probation Pass Holder 3rd Class.

    13/10/1846:  Hobart:  Misconduct in furiously riding in a public street and
                            endangering the life of a child: Two months imprisonment
                            and hard labour: Approved Broadmarsh.

    01/12/1846:  Ticket of Leave.

    08/03/1847:  Hobart:  Misconduct in being present in the Government paddock while       some men were gambling in the Government paddock: Two months imprisonment and hard labour.

    05/06/1847:  Hobart:  Out after hours: Three months imprisonment and hard labour:
                              Approved Broadmarsh 11/06/1847.

    13/12/1847:  Hobart:  Out after hours: Six days solitary.

    25/08/1848:  Hobart:  Larceny under £5: Not guilty.                             
 
    03/04/1850:  Certificate of Freedom. 

No further details for William Morris have been retrieved.                                                                 
     
                           
                      .
                                               
Notes:

(i):    See also Indent, Archives Office of Tasmania, CON14-1-33, Image Nos.40, 41, 
      (On-line 14/07/2009). 

(ii):  Conduct Record, Archives Office of Tasmania, CON33-1-73, Image No.56,
      (On-line 14/07/2009)

(iii):  Parkhurst Prison Register, The National Archives, HO24/15, p.25.                                   

(iv):  QSearch – Tasmanian Convict Records [CD-ROM]

              NB:  The website Convicts to Australia details the voyage
              of the Convict Ship “Stratheden” at the following link:
              http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/park5.html 
(v):  AOT, CON33-1-73.

                             
                              APPENDIX

JOHN CORDWELL, WILLIAM MORRIS, WILLIAM COLLIER, and EDWARD SHIELDS, were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Simpson, on the 13th of March, at the township of New Brentford, and stealing therein 40 knives, value £1.18s., the goods of George Simpson, and that Morris had been before convicted of felony.

    GEORGE SIMPSON.  About half-past eight in the morning of the 13th of March I left Brentford for London.  I have a shop at Brentford, where I sell knives – I left my son-in-law to mind it – I came home at eight at night, and found a square of glass cut – there was a hole about one and a half inch long and three-quarters wide, and a tray that was full of knives in the morning, had only three left in it – about three dozen were gone – I have seen about a dozen of them sonvce, and one of them I can swear to – the tray was close to the window – my door was left open all morning – I will swear to this one knife – I have lost knives like these fourteen, and I believe these to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR> DOANE. Q. Where do you live? A. At Brentford.  I sleep at this house – it is in the parish of Hanwell, and in the town-ship of New Brentford – the knives could have been got out quite easily by a wire, without putting the hand in – I will not swear that these knives never belonged to Mr. Baines, at Hammersmith – I believe he is here on trial – I will not swear that these do not belong to any cutler in London.

    JOHN HADDON (police-constable T.46).  I received information, and made enquiries – I got into an omnibus, and overtook the four prisoners about sox that evening – I got out and saw Morris throw four knives and a pot of marmalade over a garden – I picked up the four knives – I showed them to Mr. Simpson, and he identified them – I found on Collier seven knives, a pot of marmalade, this piece of wire, and some other things.

    WILLIAM MARSH (police-constable T.62).  I went and took Shields to the station – I found on him four knives, and one knife was given to me by a boy, which he said was flung away – I have shown them to Mr. Simpson, and he believes they are his.

    RICHARD HANCOCK (police-sergeant T.10).  I took Cordwell about ten minutes before nine o’clock the same evening.  I went to Paddington after him – he said he had never been to Brentford, and did not know where it was – I told him I took him for robbery at Brentford, and told him what I had been told by Shields – he said he would tell the Magistrate all about it.

    ROBERT NASH (police-constable S.221).  I produce a certificate of Morris’s former conviction, which I got from Clerkenwell – (read) – he is the person.

(Collins and Shields received a good character)
                                  (b)

CORDWELL -  NOT GUILTY

MORRIS - GUILTY of stealing only. Aged 14 – Transported for Seven Years –
              Parkhurst

COLLIER – GUILTY. Aged 14.  )
                                    )  Of stealing only – Confined nine days and whipped.
SHIELDS -  GUILTY. Aged 10   )

 

   

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org 14/07/2009), April 1843, trial of John Cordwell, William Morris, William Collier, Edward Shields (t18430403-1342)

Nell Murphy on 20th July, 2016 wrote of George Farnfield:

Application for permission to marry:
28 Feb 1832 - to Elizabeth Dale (per ‘Eliza’)

Application for permission to marry:
22 Dec 1836 - to Elizabeth Green (per ‘America’, widow)
Approved.
Married 25 Jan 1836 Hobart (ref. 36/1/3 no. 3127)

Nell Murphy on 20th July, 2016 wrote of George Farnfield:

George Farnfield was convicted at Surrey Dec 1824 for horse stealing. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per ‘Medina’ 1826.

Married, wife and one child at Surrey.

Assignments in Colony
Ticket of Leave granted
Conditional Pardon granted 1 Feb 1838 (No. 1554)

Nell Murphy on 20th July, 2016 wrote of George Bromfield:

George Bromfield was convicted at Southampton 10 July 1839 for killing his wife. Previous offence for felony. 15yr transportation sentence - to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the ‘Canton’ 1840.

Married - widowed. 5 children. Farm labourer.
Stated he was going to strike one of the children when his wife tried to prevent him and he struck her.

2 yrs Probation in Colony.
Assignments.
7 July 1846: Ticket of Leave

Nell Murphy on 20th July, 2016 wrote of George Harfield:

George Harfield was convicted at Surrey 31 July 1848 for stealing a watch. 7yr transportation sentence - to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Rodney’ 1850.

Aged 21yrs; labourer; Church of England; read & write, a little; 5’7 1/4”.
Native place: Ham nr Richmond, England.

Assignments in Colony.
1851: New Town & Hobart
1852: a Constable at Launceston
13 Mar 1852: Ticket of Leave granted
14 June 1853: Conditional Pardon
4 Aug 1857: Certificate of Freedom

Nell Murphy on 20th July, 2016 wrote of John Frost:

John Frost was convicted at Middlesex 17 Feb 1819 for Highway Robbery, at St. Margaret, Winchester, together with George Armfield. Death sentence, commuted to Life Sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Dromedary’ 1820.

Aged 17yrs.

Assignments in Colony.
Several record of misconduct and punishments.
Conditional Pardon 1840.

Nell Murphy on 20th July, 2016 wrote of Anthony Bosley:

Anthony Bosley/Bazley was convicted at, Devon 15 March 1819. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Guildford’ 1820.

Aged 38yrs; labourer; 5’10”.
Native place: Somerset, England.

Assignments in the Colony.
Ticket of Leave (prior to 1831)
Conditional Pardon 12 Oct 1836

Lesley Barford on 20th July, 2016 wrote of John Barford:

Stole a trunk of clothing valued at 39shillings. Tried at Old Bailey 14 December, 1785. Had no trade recorded at the time. Left on the Alexander May, 1787. Was recorded as a carpenter in 1791 on Norfolk Island.

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