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Recent Submissions

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Ann Jones:

Thomas and the family appear in 1828.

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Page 342, Ref S1238] Smart, Thomas, 53, Admiral Gambier, 1808, Bootmaker, Pitt Street, Sydney.
[Ref S1239] Smart, Thomas, 18, born in colony.
[Ref S1240] Smart, Ann, 14, born in colony.
[Ref S1241] Smart, Zenobia, 11, born in colony.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Ann Jones:

Ancestry.com; Convict Musters.
1822:
Thomas Smart Admiral Gambier 7 years Shoemaker Sydney.
Thomas Smart 12 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.
Augustus Smart 9 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.
Ann Jane Smart 8 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.
Zenobia Smart 4 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.

1825:
John [sic] Smart free by servitude Admiral Gambier 1809 7 years householder, Sydney
Thomas Smart born in colony 15 son of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.
Augustus Smart born in colony 13 son of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.
Ann Jane born in colony 11 daughter of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.
Zenobia born in colony 8 daughter of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.
It would appear that Ann was deceased prior to 1822 or perhaps has left the family?

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Ann Jones:

Baxter, Carol; General Musters of New South Wales, 1811 and 1814.
1811:
[Ref 4409] Thomas Smart, Admiral Gambier, Off Stores, Shoemaker.
[Ref 6097] Ann Jones, Aeolus, Off Stores, wife to T Smart.

1814:
[Ref 5353] Thomas Smart, Admiral Gambier, Tried March 1807, Lancaster, 7 years (PRO n2938).
[Ref 3153] Ann Jones, Tried March 1807, Lancaster, 7 years (PRO n3679).

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Ann Jones:

In the colony, Ann married? Thomas Smart (Convict, Admiral Gambier, 1808), sometime around 1809.
The couple had 4 children: Thomas 1810, Augusta 1811, Ann Jane 1814 and Zenobia 1818.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Thomas Smart:

It would appear that Ann was deceased prior to 1822 or perhaps has left the family?

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Page 342, Ref S1238] Smart, Thomas, 53, Admiral Gambier, 1808, Bootmaker, Pitt Street, Sydney.
[Ref S1239] Smart, Thomas, 18, born in colony.
[Ref S1240] Smart, Ann, 14, born in colony.
[Ref S1241] Smart, Zenobia, 11, born in colony.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Thomas Smart:

Ancestry.com; Convict Musters.
1822:
Thomas Smart Admiral Gambier 7 years Shoemaker Sydney.
Thomas Smart 12 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.
Augustus Smart 9 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.
Ann Jane Smart 8 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.
Zenobia Smart 4 born in colony, child of Thomas Smart.

1825:
John [sic] Smart free by servitude Admiral Gambier 1809 7 years householder, Sydney
Thomas Smart born in colony 15 son of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.
Augustus Smart born in colony 13 son of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.
Ann Jane born in colony 11 daughter of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.
Zenobia born in colony 8 daughter of John [sic] Smart, Sydney.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Thomas Smart:

Baxter, Carol; General Musters of New South Wales, 1811 and 1814.
1811:
[Ref 4409] Thomas Smart, Admiral Gambier, Off Stores, Shoemaker.
[Ref 6097] Ann Jones, Aeolus, Off Stores, wife to T Smart.

1814:
[Ref 5353] Thomas Smart, Admiral Gambier, Tried March 1807, Lancaster, 7 years (PRO n2938).
[Ref 3153] Ann Jones, Tried March 1807, Lancaster, 7 years (PRO n3679).

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Thomas Smart:

In the colony, Thomas married? Ann Jane Ware Jones sometime around 1809. (Convict, Aeolus, 1808)
The couple had 4 children: Thomas 1810, Augusta 1811, Ann Jane 1814 and Zenobia 1818.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Thomas Smart:

Leeds Mercury Sat 21 Mar 1807 p.3…...
The following is taken from a list of fifty five prisoners who are to take their trials at Lancaster Assizes, which commenced on Wednesday last:-...
Thomas Smart and Margaret Gill, charged with stealing nineteen shawls, and other articles from W. Wyke, of Preston.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Joseph Flood:

Baxter, Carol; Musters of New South Wales and Norfolk Island: 1805-1806
[Ref A1442] Joseph Flood, Boddingtons, FBS, Boatman.
[Ref A1786] Ann Gorman, Marquis Cornwallis, with Joseph Flood.
[Ref C0496] Ann Gorman, Marquis Cornwallis, 3 (natural) children. (This would probably be John, Joseph and Thomas).

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Joseph Flood:

Joseph had a probably defacto, long term, relationship with Ann Gorman (Convict, Marquis Cornwallis, 1796).  It would appear that they were together as early as 1796.
They had 6 children 5 boys and 1 girl: John 1797, Joseph 1799, Thomas 1802, Edward 1805, James 1807 and Eleanor 1809.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Anne Gorman:

Baxter, Carol; Musters of New South Wales and Norfolk Island: 1805-1806
[Ref A1786] Ann Gorman, Marquis Cornwallis, with Joseph Flood.
[Ref C0496] Ann Gorman, Marquis Cornwallis, 3 (natural) children. (This would probably be John, Joseph and Thomas).

Baxter, Carol; General Musters of New South Wales, Norfolk Island and Van Diemens Land: 1811.
[Ref 2323] Ann Gorman, Marquis Cornwallis, Tried April 1793, Dublin, 7 years (PRO n4701)

#Note 1 Joseph has died in 1808 so is not recorded in 1811. Ann died in 1814 so is not recorded there.
# Note 2 Ann Germaine, however, is recorded both in 1811 [Ref 2239] and 1814 [Ref 1613].

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Anne Gorman:

Ann had a probably defacto, long term, relationship with Joseph Flood (Convict, Boddingtons, 1793).  It would appear that they were together as early as 1796.
They had 6 children 5 boys and 1 girl: John 1797, Joseph 1799, Thomas 1802, Edward 1805, James 1807 and Eleanor 1809.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Anne Gorman:

There are several sources which have clearly mixed up the two convict women…
Ann Gorman, Marquis Cornwallis, 1796 (ex Dublin, Ireland).
Ann Germaine, Mary Ann, 1791, (ex Norfolk, England).

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of John Watson:

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Page 384, Ref W0647] Watson, John, 67, Ganges, Pensioner at Benevolent Asylum, Sydney.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of John Watson:

John can be Located in several of the Muster lists:
Baxter, Carol; General Musters of New South Wales:
1806:
[Ref A4711] John Watson, Ganges, Prisoner, Government Parramatta.

1811:
[Ref 6093] Watson, John, Ganges, Tried Jul 1792, York, Life. (PRO n2130).

1814:
[Ref 2432} JOhn Watson, Ganges, On Stores. Overseer at the Factory.

D Wong on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Edward Masterson:

Edward Masterson was 69 years old on arrival in NSW – he was married with 9 children.

Sick list of the Borodino convict ship for 4 December 1827 to 25 July 1828….
Edward Masterson, aged 69, convict; disease, diarrhoea; put on sick list, 18 February 1828. Date discharged 29 February 1828.

1836: TOL Field of Mars.
1/7/1843: CP

April 1850: Was and inmate of the Parramatta Benevolent Society.

No date of death found.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of John Watson:

In the colony, John married Esther Hacker (Convict, Indispensible, 1796), March 6th 1798, at Sydney.
The couple had 3 children between 1798 and 1801. Mary 1798, Margaret 1799 and John 1801.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Esther Hacker:

In the colony, Esther married John Watson (Convict, Ganges, 1797), March 6th 1798, at Sydney.
The couple had 3 children between 1798 and 1801. Mary 1798, Margaret 1799 and John 1801.

Esther is recorded in the 1802 Muster:
[Ref AF269] Hacker, Esther, TL.

D Wong on 13th February, 2016 wrote of John Shea:

Birth dates of 1793 1799 and 1808 listed for this man.

John Shea was said to be 20 years old on arrival in NSW.

From the Sick list of the Borodino convict ship for 4 December 1827 to 25 July 1828:
John Shea, aged 20, convict; disease, ophthalmia; put on sick list, 16 April 1828. Date discharged 23 April 1828.
Assigned to Sir John Jamison, Regent Ville.

22/7/1829: Assigned to James Webber at Tocal.

John was married - Wife, Johanna Casey, residing at Kilgarvin.  He was 5’1 ¾” tall, brown hair, dark hazel eyes, ruddy freckled complexion, several moles on lower part of right cheek – John spoke no English. Was RC and illiterate.

17/10/1834: COF

20/8/1836: From Dublin Castle. John Shea, Borodino 1828. Johanna Casey and one child – accepted offer of free passage “but when order was sent for her and daughter to embark per Thos Harriden it was reported that she had removed to some other place – not known where”.

3/10/1845 Sydney Morning Herald:
HIGHWAY ROBBERY.
John Shea, free by servitude, was indicted, first, for an assault with intent to murder ; and second, with intent to do some serious bodily injury.
The prisoner being unable to employ counsel, His HONOR requested Mr. Lowe to undertake his defense, which he consented to do ; Mr. J.W. Bligh volunteering to render such aid and assistance as he could ; and the prisoner was as ably defended as if he had paid some £20 for that purpose.
From the evidence of the prosecutor, it appeared that on the 30th of April last, as he was proceeding from Bathurst to his own residence, at Clear Creek, about ten miles from Bathurst, when within about two miles of his home, he met with, and was stopped, by the prisoner, who rushed from behind a tree, and presented a gun at him, and ordered him to stand and deliver what money he had ; he told him he had only one penny on his person, which he threw to the prisoner, who then ordered him to take off his coat, waistcoat, and boots, and to turn out his trousers pockets, and desired the prosecutor to stand off from the clothes he had been denuded of.
The prisoner then commenced overhauling the clothes, and whilst examining the contents of a snuff-box, Falvey, the prosecutor rushed on him, and succeeded in seizing from his possession the gun, and during the struggle for its possession, the prisoner attempted to fire the piece off, but it fortunately missed fire, and Falvey succeeded in securing the gun, and flung it from him, when the prisoner drew from beneath his coat a sword or cutlass that he had there concealed, and made an attack on the prosecutor, and for the possession of this instrument another struggle took place, and the prosecutor eventually succeeded in gaining possession of it, but not before some wounds had been inflicted on both sides; prosecutor ultimately succeeded in securing the prisoner, and dragged him to his own residence, a distance of two miles, and secured him by tying him with some green hide ; he then sent in to Bathurst, and two constables came out and took charge of the prisoner ; during the struggle several wounds were inflicted (but none serious) and both parties bled profusely.
His HONOR passed a high eulogium on the prosecutor for his bravery and determination on the occasion.
The prisoner at the conclusion declared his innocence of the charge, and His HONOR passed a very severe animated version on the heinousness of such a declaration, in a case where his guilt had been so very clearly proved.

The Jury, after retiring a very short time, returned a verdict of guilty on the second count, and he was sentenced to transportation for life.

8/12/1845: Arrived on Norfolk Island,.
13/5/1851: Arrived in VDL per ‘Wanderer’.

John was then described as 52 years old, farm labourer, fresh complexion, reddish to grey hair, dark hazel eyes.

1852: Last entry in his conduct record book, no CP date found and no death date.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Esther Hacker:

ESTHER HACKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April, a pair of callico breeches, value 5s. a callico waistcoat, value 5s. ten callico shirts, value 2l. 5s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 8s. a muslin gown, with lace robbins, value 7s. a linen jacket, value 1s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. a callico petticoat, value 1s. a linen jacket, value 6d. a pair of cotton drawers, value 6d. three pair of cotton stockings, value 3s. four linen caps, value 3s. six linen caps, value 3s. a cotton jacket, value 3s. a cotton handage, value 3d. a twild callico napkin, value 1s. a cotton petticoat, value 9d. six other muslin handkerchiefs, value 6s. a muslin caul and head piece to a cap, value 1s. two muslin sleeves of a gown, value 6d. a pair of silk stockings, value 1s. a mounted fan, value 1s. 6d, half a yard of printed linen cloth, value 4s. a small piece of sheeting, value 6d. a yard of corded dimity, value 1s. 6d. five pillow cases, value 5s. and one pebble box, value 2s. the goods of William Prescott, Esq. in his dwelling house.
WILLIAM PRESCOTT sworn.
I live at No. 5, Hind-street, Manchester-square , I reside there, I was in that house when I discovered I had been robbed, the articles were kept in that house, the prisoner was a servant; on Wednesday the 16th of April, I turned the prisoner away from my service, I ordered my butler to collect her things together and put them in the entry, and put them in a hackney coach. I had not been in the habit of visiting many of my servants trunks when they left my service, but perceiving if I did so in this instance, it might lead to the unfolding something very unfortunate that had happened in my family, I determined to discover what was in her trunk, I therefore demanded of her, her keys, she refused to give them, I called up my servants that they might have the testimony of what I did, I told her it was in vain to deny, for the more she denied the more I would persist, and she at last gave the keys up to the butler, the trunk was opened, and the first thing that discovered itself was the callico breeches and waistcoat of mine, they are of a very fine description of cloth called, Isares. On this I went to the police office in Marlborough street, for a constable, I did not choose to proceed farther of myself, a constable, of the name of Hamilton, was sent with me, and he examined and found all the articles contained in the indictment, which are my property. I have undervalued them considerably in the indictment.
Q. Had you missed any articles before this time? - Never, not during this woman living with me.
Q. How long had this woman lived with you? - She had lived with me two periods, and I took her back the second time because I thought her an excellent character, she had lived with me formerly as a nurse maid, she attended on me in my illness; the last time she came to attend about the house, occasionally to attend my wife, the first time she lived with me fifteen months, the last time about two months; I took her in again merely because I thought her an excellent character, and as such I should have given her to any other place had I not found this out.
Q. Before you found these things in the box, had you missed any of them? - None, I had not a suspicion of the kind.
Q. Had you any reason to open the box? - Yes, I had reason, but not expecting or suspecting any thing of this.
Q. Was there any thing in the trunk besides your things? - Yes, there were some articles of her own.
Q. Had she any articles there which she claimed to be her own? - Yes, she had some.
SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn.
I am a constable belonging to Mary-le-bone; I saw the box opened; it was the prisoner’s, she was standing by and acknowledged it to be her’s, there were some little things of her own in it, and the greatest part of the articles, which I produce here, were found in that box, some I found in another box up stairs, which had never been removed.
Q. How do you know the box above stairs was the prisoner’s? - Because she brought it down herself into the entry where the other was. It was a small paper box.
Court to Prescott. You say that the articles which were delivered to the constable are belonging to you; and all the articles are put in the indictment? - They are, I believe them all to be mine; I can swear them all to be mine. The fine shifts are marked I. B. with a cross, they have never been marked since they were washed in India; I can at all times tell things that have been washed in India. I do not conceive, from the circumstances I have collected in my family, that the prisoner could have taken all these things at one time.
GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 30s. (Aged 29.)
Transported for seven years.
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of Jane Reid:

Almost nothing has been located so far on Jane.

Jane is believed to have been transported on the “Lady Juliana”, which arrived in the colony June 6th 1790 as part of the second fleet.
A little more than a month after landing, Jane married William Davis (Convict, Scarborough, 1790). They married 30 July 1790 at Sydney Cove and the very next day, were part of the 194 convict contingent (mostly women) sent to Norfolk Island aboard “Surprize”.
William and Jane were allowed to cultivate a small piece of land at Charlotte Field, which they cleared and were issued with a government sow. Two children were born to the couple, Mary Reid 1792 and Euphemia Reid 1795.  William was granted a conditional pardon in February 1797 and then joined the New South Wales Corps.
It appears that Jane must have died C1800, because she disappears from the victualing lists around that time and is not recorded in any of the Musters. However, the two daughters Mary and Euphemia are recorded and were still on Norfolk in 1803.
Baxter, Carol; Musters and Lists, New South Wales and Norfolk Island, 1800-1802:
[Ref CA569] Mary Reed, child over 10.
[Ref CA571] Euphemia Reed, child over 10.

I have been able to trace Euphemia; As Euphemia Davis, she married Samuel Franklin (Convict, Indian 1810) in 1813 at Parramatta. She died in 1828.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of William Davis:

On July 24th 1819, William married Ann Daniel (Convict, Wanstead, 1814) at St Lukes.
They were recorded in the 1822 Muster; William as a landholder, with 210 cares held by grant, 60 cleared, 24 acres wheat, 4 barley, 2 orchard and garden. He had a horse, 36 cattle, 70 hogs, and 80 bushels of wheat in store. Ann was with him as were two daughters aged 13 and 9, (presumably his children by Amy Burke).

William died at Airds, in May 1823. He had been described in 1808 thus:
Aged 39 years and 10 months, born in Kircudbright, Scotland. Five feet, seven and a half inches in height, with dark brown hair, green eyes, and a round fair complexioned visage.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of William Davis:

William returned to Sydney before 1806 and is then recorded in the Muster as a soldier and living with Amy Burke (Convict, Nile, 1801). The couple married at St Johns, Parramatta, September 6th 1811. They had 3 children; William 1806, Jane 1810, Sarah 1814. Amy died in 1818.

Denis Pember on 13th February, 2016 wrote of William Davis:

William was transported on the “Scarborough”, which arrived in the colony June 28th 1790 as part of the second fleet.
A little more than a month after landing, William married Jane Reid (Convict, Lady Juliana, 1790). They married 30 July 1790 at Sydney Cove and very the next day, were part of the 194 convict contingent (mostly women) sent to Norfolk Island aboard “Surprize”.
William and Jane were allowed to cultivate a small piece of land at Charlotte Field, which they cleared and were issued with a government sow. Two children were born to the couple, Mary Reid 1792 and Euphemia Reid 1795.  William was granted a conditional pardon in February 1797 and then joined the New South Wales Corps.
It appears that Jane must have died C1800, because she disappears from the victualing lists and is not recorded in the Musters. However, the two daughters are recorded and were still there in 1803.

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