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Recent Submissions

Damienne Bell on 1st February, 2015 wrote of James Summers:

James Summers, posing as Captain John Alexander Conroy, was charged at the Gloucester Assizes on 15 Dec 1862 for forging a check for £100 and having it cashed at a Cirencester bank. He also married Emily Dawson Graham on Jan 11 1862 in Windsor and Jane Cowley Date on 9 July 1862 in Cirencester while still married to his first wife, Margaret Londan Summers of Islington, but was not charged with bigamy.

Robin Sharkey on 1st February, 2015 wrote of James Crone:

COMMUTING THE SENTENCE OF JAMES CRONE:

Belfast Newsletter, 13 April 1810, page 2:

“The Lord Lieutenant, on the application of the prosecutor, and on reference to the report of the Judge, has respited the execution of the sentence of death against James Crone, convicted at the last assizes at Carrickfergus for robbing a bleach-green, on condition of his being transported for life.”

Anonymous on 1st February, 2015 wrote of James Mccarthy:

JAMES McCARTHY’s TRIAL REPORT:

Freeman’s Journal 24th March 1810 p 3:

The following are the convictions that have taken place at the Ennis Assizes, which ended on Saturday: James McCarthy, sentenced to be hanged on Saturday 14th April next, for burglary and felonyine th dwelling house of Michael Marsh.”

Lynton Bradford on 1st February, 2015 wrote of Jane Smith:

She and her husband recorded as the first official residents of Nowra NSW Australia. Was a highly respected, wealthy and influential member of that community.

Robin Sharkey on 1st February, 2015 wrote of Timothy Sheedy:

FIRST REPORT OF HIS IRISH CRIME:

Freemans Journal, 21 March 1809, page 3:

“LIMERICK, March 17 - Since the commencement of our Assizes the following persons were tried and convicted in the county court: - Timothy SHEEDY, for stealing 5 sheep, the property of Richard Rawleigh - Guilty - sentenced to be transported”

Aggy Walker on 1st February, 2015 wrote of William Walker:

William was baptised in the parish church of All Saints, Willian, Hertfordshire on 14th February 1813 (Source: Parish Register)

Family Members
Parents:

Thomas Walker
1775 – 1853

Hannah Walker nee Hooper
1785 – 1834

Spouse:
Sarah Walker nee Holmes
1809 – 1844 - she came from the nearby village called Norton.There is no marriage record in St. Mary the Virgin, Baldock, Parish Registers for William Walker & Sarah - it is quite likely that any marriage ceremony was conducted in the Friends Meeting House, Baldock as there was a strong Quaker influence in the town

Children: (These were sent to St Alban’s Workhouse after William -a new widow - was sentenced)

James Walker
1832 –

George Walker
1834 –

William Walker
1837 – 1902

Mary Ann Allen nee Walker
1839 –

Emma Walker
1840 –

(Source: 1841 UK Census for Baldock,Hertfordshire)

William was well known to the local judge. He had previous convictions:
7 Dec 1830
Age: 17
Bedford Assizes
Bound over with Thomas Walker to keep the peace

1833
Age: 20
Baldock Court Session, Baldock, Hertfordshire, England
Sentenced to 2 weeks hard labour followed by 2 weeks solitary confinement in the Bridewell & a whipping for stealing a tea kettle worth 8s from Edwin Smith, an Innkeeper

It is not known where William settled after he had completed his 7 years

Robin Sharkey on 31st January, 2015 wrote of James Connolly:

REPORT OF CRIME OF MURDER

Freemans Journal, Thursday 2nd November, 1809 page 3

John SINNOTT, James CONOLLY, Thomas SHIELDS,  Christopher FINNEGAN were indicted for the murder of Thomas Cunningham in the month of May last, at Santry in the county of Dublin.

The circumstances of this case were rather unusual. The prisoners at the bar, together with the deceased, an an approver of the name of Timothy Dwyer, in the month of May last, [1809] went out to commit robberies. In the evening of 25th of that month {may 1809] they stopped a jaunting car and were about to rob a man of the name of Kelsh who was upon it, when the pistol which Sinnot then had went off by accident, and the contents having lodged in the left breast of their companion Thomas Cunningham, he was brought up to the jaunting car of the man they stopped (who was acquainted with one of the robbers) to Kelsh’s house, where he languished about two hours and then died.

The next evening Dwyer, the approver, with the two prisoners Conolly and Shields, came and tok the body away, it was buried in Glasnevin churchyard,  but in the few weeks after, when doe robbers were apprehended in the country, this transaction came to light, the body was taken up and an inquest held.

The evidence on the trial gave all the circumstances and facts in the clearest point of view and Lord Norbury, after laying down the law of the case, gave a most impartial charge to the jury, who retired for some time, and returned with a verdict against all the prisoners - GUILTY.

Lord Norbury then, in a very impressive manner, pronounced the awful sentence of the law, pursuant to the statues, by which they are to be executed on Thursday next [ i.e 9th November ] and their bodies handed over to the surgeons for dissection. All the prisoners upon receiving sentence, conducted themselves in the most hardened manner, declaring their innocence, and calling the jury a set of perjured men

Robin Sharkey on 31st January, 2015 wrote of Christopher Finnegan:

REPORT OF CRIME OF MURDER

Freemans Journal, Thursday 2nd November, 1809 page 3

John SINNOTT, James CONOLLY, Thomas SHIELDS,  Christopher FINNEGAN were indicted for the murder of Thomas Cunningham in the month of May last, at Santry in the county of Dublin.

The circumstances of this case were rather unusual. The prisoners at the bar, together with the deceased, an an approver of the name of Timothy Dwyer, in the month of May last, [1809] went out to commit robberies. In the evening of 25th of that month {may 1809] they stopped a jaunting car and were about to rob a man of the name of Kelsh who was upon it, when the pistol which Sinnot then had went off by accident, and the contents having lodged in the left breast of their companion Thomas Cunningham, he was brought up to the jaunting car of the man they stopped (who was acquainted with one of the robbers) to Kelsh’s house, where he languished about two hours and then died.

The next evening Dwyer, the approver, with the two prisoners Conolly and Shields, came and tok the body away, it was buried in Glasnevin churchyard,  but in the few weeks after, when doe robbers were apprehended in the country, this transaction came to light, the body was taken up and an inquest held.

The evidence on the trial gave all the circumstances and facts in the clearest point of view and Lord Norbury, after laying down the law of the case, gave a most impartial charge to the jury, who retired for some time, and returned with a verdict against all the prisoners - GUILTY.

Lord Norbury then, in a very impressive manner, pronounced the awful sentence of the law, pursuant to the statues, by which they are to be executed on Thursday next [ i.e 9th November ] and their bodies handed over to the surgeons for dissection. All the prisoners upon receiving sentence, conducted themselves in the most hardened manner, declaring their innocence, and calling the jury a set of perjured men

Robin Sharkey on 31st January, 2015 wrote of Michael Sheile:

REPORT OF CRIME OF MURDER

Freemans Journal, Thursday 2nd November, 1809 page 3

John SINNOTT, James CONOLLY, Thomas SHIELDS,  Christopher FINNEGAN were indicted for the murder of Thomas Cunningham in the month of May last, at Santry in the county of Dublin.

The circumstances of this case were rather unusual. The prisoners at the bar, together with the deceased, an an approver of the name of Timothy Dwyer, in the month of May last, [1809] went out to commit robberies. In the evening of 25th of that month {may 1809] they stopped a jaunting car and were about to rob a man of the name of Kelsh who was upon it, when the pistol which Sinnot then had went off by accident, and the contents having lodged in the left breast of their companion Thomas Cunningham, he was brought up to the jaunting car of the man they stopped (who was acquainted with one of the robbers) to Kelsh’s house, where he languished about two hours and then died.

The next evening Dwyer, the approver, with the two prisoners Conolly and Shields, came and tok the body away, it was buried in Glasnevin churchyard,  but in the few weeks after, when doe robbers were apprehended in the country, this transaction came to light, the body was taken up and an inquest held.

The evidence on the trial gave all the circumstances and facts in the clearest point of view and Lord Norbury, after laying down the law of the case, gave a most impartial charge to the jury, who retired for some time, and returned with a verdict against all the prisoners - GUILTY.

Lord Norbury then, in a very impressive manner, pronounced the awful sentence of the law, pursuant to the statues, by which they are to be executed on Thursday next [ i.e 9th November ] and their bodies handed over to the surgeons for dissection. All the prisoners upon receiving sentence, conducted themselves in the most hardened manner, declaring their innocence, and calling the jury a set of perjured men

Robin Sharkey on 31st January, 2015 wrote of John Sinnott:

REPORT OF CRIME OF MURDER

Freemans Journal, Thursday 2nd November, 1809 page 3

John SINNOTT, James CONOLLY, Thomas SHIELDS,  Christophr FINNEGAN were indicted for the murder of Thomas Cunningham in the month of May last, at Santry in the county of Dublin.

The circumstances of this case were rather unusual. The prisoners at the bar, together with the deceased, an an approver of the name of Timothy Dwyer, in the month of May last, [1809] went out to commit robberies. In the evening of 25th of that month {may 1809] they stopped a jaunting car and were about to rob a man of the name of Kelsh who was upon it, when the pistol which Sinnot then had went off by accident, and the contents having lodged in the left breast of their companion Thomas Cunningham, he was brought up to the jaunting car of the man they stopped (who was acquainted with one of the robbers) to Kelsh’s house, where he languished about two hours and then died.

The next evening Dwyer, the approver, with the two prisoners Conolly and Shields, came and tok the body away, it was buried in Glasnevin churchyard,  but in the few weeks after, when doe robbers were apprehended in the country, this transaction came to light, the body was taken up and an inquest held.

The evidence on the trial gave all the circumstances and facts in the clearest point of view and Lord Norbury, after laying down the law of the case, gave a most impartial charge to the jury, who retired for some time, and returned with a verdict against all the prisoners - GUILTY.

Lord Norbury then, in a very impressive manner, pronounced the awful sentence of the law, pursuant to the statues, by which they are to be executed on Thursday next [ i.e 9th November ] and their bodies handed over to the surgeons for dissection.All the prisoners upon receiving sentence, conducted themselves in the most hardened manner, declaring their innocence, and calling the jury a set of perjured men.

Margaret on 31st January, 2015 wrote of Charles Goodwin:

Assigned to Charles Throsby of Throsby Park given his freedom certificate in Illawarra Dist 1841.

Robin Sharkey on 31st January, 2015 wrote of Sarah Broadfield:

Correction: Arrived on “NORTHUMBERLAND” transport ship, 1815.  Her common law husband in NSW, Michael Joyce, Arrived on the “Providence”, 1811.

Robin Sharkey on 31st January, 2015 wrote of Sarah Broadfield:

Sarah Gillingham arrived as “Sarah Broadfield, ALIAS Gillingham”.  She arrived on the Provident transport ship from London in 1815.  She was English, said to be aged 38.  In NSW She was known as “Gillingham”.  The name Sarah Broadfield, was not used in NSW.

AGE -  She was said to be aged 38 but the Old Bailey proceedings [incorrectly] had recorded “48”.  This is consistent with her year of birth 1777 given in her Sept 1828 Cert of Freedom indicating also indicating she was 38 in 1815, and aged 51 in 1828.  In the 1828 Census she vainly said she was 49.  She died in 1850 said to be aged 70, she’s have been 72 or 73 based on the above.

DESCRIPTION: 4ft 10inches tall, grey eyes & dark brown hair, skin fair and a little pockpitted, and a hairy mole on her upper lip (From 1828 Certificate of Freedom)

She was tried at the Old Bailey on 14 Sept 1814 for receiving stolen goods. This was a ham she received in her shop near Holborn, London, from two young boys aged 9 and 11, who were tried for the theft. From the evidence, she had clearly put them up to stealing the ham, aiming to re-sell it in her shop.  Also, it was clear she had used these little boys for the same theft & receiving purpose in the past.  This time the whole transaction had been observed by a constable in the shop opposite. She tried to bribe him not to charge her but the constable wouldn’t be in it.

She got 14 years’ transportation. The two young boys had their judgement respited given their extreme youth.

In her criminal trial at the Old Bailey she was referred to by the young boy witnesses as “Mrs Gillingham”, but also as “Mrs Broadbent”

In NSW she set up house with Michael Joyce, an Irishman who’d arrived four years before her transported on the “Providence” for Life.  HE got a Conditional Pardon in 1818. At first he ran a bakery during the 1820’s from George Street, near Brickfield Hill where she was described in the 1822 Muster as his housekeeper, then about 1824 they moved to Castlereagh St.  Sarah Gillingham ran a small “dealing” business, buying and selling, out of the same premises, but this was probably a pawnshop even at that early stage of her business in NSW.

OLD BAILEY TRIAL
818. JAMES TUCKER and ANDREW WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , four pounds weight of bacon, value 4 s. the property of Robert Griffiths . And SARAH BROADFIELD , alias GILLINGHAM , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, she well knowing it to be stolen .

ROBERT GRIFFITHS . I am a chandler ; I live at the corner of Great Saffron-hill.
Q. On Friday evening, the 12th of August, do you remember some boys coming to your shop - A. It was the night before the boys came.

Q. How many in number came - A. I think as many as seven or eight came; it was just after dark; they asked for a halfpenny worth of small beer; the girl drawed it; they drank it; they handed it from one to another. I did not notice the boys going away. I can only identify them from seeing them in the watchhouse; two of the boys are here were in my shop; and Dearns. My wife missed a piece of bacon the next morning, it was laying in the shop under two sugar bags. The next morning Barnley brought the bacon to me.

JOHN DEARNS Q . Do you know these two boys, Tucker and Ward - A. Yes.
Q. Do you remember being taken up by Barnley - A. Yes.
Q. The night before you were taken up by Barnley, had you been to Mr. Griffiths’s shop - A. Yes
Q. Were these two boys Tucker, and Ward, with you - A. There were six boys altogether.
Q. For what purpose did you go there - A. To endeavour to take this piece of bacon. When I went into the shop, I asked for a halfpennyworth of small beer; the beer was given us, and while it was handed about, Tucker took this piece of bacon.
Q. Did you see him take it - A. No. I knew what he was going to do; we all knew it.
Q. After he had got the bacon, and you all had the beer, what did you do - A. We bursted out a laughing, and went out of the shop; we ran up Saffron-hill; towards Holborn; that took us towards Mrs. Gillingham’s.
Q. Had you known Mrs. Gillingham’s before - A. No; only what the boys told me. I knew they were going to Mrs. Gillingham’s.
Q. What became of the bacon - A. We sold it to her; Ward and Tucker took it to her; we waited at a place while they went in; Ward and Tucker went to her shop. When they came out they brought a shilling; we spent the shilling, some bought fruit and others bought bread with it; we divided it; we all had two-pence a piece. About four o’clock the next afternoon, we were all taken up.

JOHN BARNLEY. I am an officer. On the evening of Friday, the 12th of August, I was in a shop directly opposite Mrs. Broadfield’s; I was in Mrs. Cook’s shop. While I was there, I observed the boy, Tucker, go in with something under his jacket, and hand it over the counter; I then saw Mrs. Broadfield take it into the back room.
Q. What was it - A. I could not exactly see what it was then; she took it into the back room; she either put it on a shelf or hung it to the ceiling; she reached up high with it; she then came back into the shop, opened the drawer, took out some money, and gave it to the boy Tucker; Ward was with him.
Q. Did Ward go in with him - A. I think he did; if he did not, he went to the door with him. I got a search warrant, and searched Mrs. Broadfield’s house the next day; I searched that place where I saw her reach her hand up; my brother officer would search the place and found that piece of bacon; it was hung up to the ceiling, just at the place where I had seen her reach her hand up. I had learned of the boys where they had taken it from. I sent for Mr. Griffiths; he claimed it. This is the piece of bacon. Mrs. Broadfield told me if I could get the bill thrown out, she would give me forty pounds; I told her it must go on in its regular course.

Mr. Griffiths. This is my piece of bacon; I cut it myself. The moment I saw it, I knew it.

Tucker’s Defence. She told me to get more bacon, she would give me more money for it, and Mrs. Broadfield told me to cut gentlemen’s seals off, and afterwards Mrs. Gillingham said, not to bring bacon, to bring better things.

Ward’s Defence. She told me not to bring bacon, but to bring better things.

Broadfield said nothing in her defence.

TUCKER, GUILTY, aged 11 }  Judgment
WARD, GUILTY, aged 9 }  respited

BROADFIELD, GUILTY , aged 48.
Transported for Fourteen Years .

_________________

- Ticket of Leave No 1133 [unknown date]
- Certificate of Freedom was no 28/0826 dated 22 September 1828,  SRNSW 4/4294; Reel 983

30 May 1828 - the Australian
TRIAL  
Michael Joyce and Sarah Gillman [sic] were indicted for being knowingly the receivers of certain articles of property stolen some months ago out of the dwelling house of Mrs. Mary Reynolds.  From what evidence was adduced, the following may be concluded as the most striking features of this case :         
After the foul murder of Mr. Henry Marr’s old servant, Davis, in the early part of the past month, and the partial plunder of his house which succeeded it, many suspicious houses in the neighbourhood, it may he recollected, underwent a strict search in order, if possibles to gain some clue to the murderer, as well as to the stolen goods. Among others, the house in Castlereagh-street, occupied by the prisoner Joyce and the woman Gillman, who went under the character of his housekeeper, was entered and searched by the constabulary. Some articles of jewellery, and several boxes containing wearing apparel and other matters, to certain portions of which the male prisoner laid claim, and to others the female prisoner, were opened, and the contents examined. Mr Marr was unable to swear positively as to any of the articles having been stolen from his possession, but as
suspicions against the prisoners were not by this means any way lightened, the constables took possession of such matters as might happen to be deemed of any value, which were transported forthwith to the Police Office, where a list of the articles was made up, and
rendered public, in order that all persons having a fair claim to any of the articles, might have an opportunity of identifying them, and of substantiating such claim. The prosecutrix had had some jewellery stolen from her possession a short time before, and hearing of jewellery laying at the Police Office for claimants, the prosecutrix went to the Police Office
to discover if any of the jewellery bore a resemblance to that she had lost, but on taking a full view of what lay there, the prosecutrix could discover nothing to which she could claim, excepting a few towels and a pocket handkerchief, bearing her initials which she could distinctly swear to have been, and of right to be hers. The female, Gillman, pleaded that she was in the habit of selling goods for other articles, which she retained, if necessary, until redeemed, and that this trade was carried on quite apart from Joyce’s business as baker. Witness, on behalf of the prisoners, were called, who spoke very favourably as to
their character. This had a due influence upon the Jury, which acquitted both prisoners -and they were with, the consent of the Attorney General, who desired to forego any further proceeding in their case, discharged by proclamation. 

Late 1820’s and early 1930’s - Michael Joyce had financial difficlties, a property sold by eth Sgeriff and they no logger lvdd in Castlereagh St bakery premises.

Sydney Monitor, 26 March 1831 - Sarah Gillingham petitioned as creditor against Michael Joyce for insolvency. Presumably this went nowhere …

Sydney Gazette 5 June 1832
Mary Ryan brought charge against Michael Joyce and Sarah Gillman for “assaulting her window shutter” but the case was dismissed - it appearing that no assault had been committed on Mary Ryan herself.

In 1834 they lied at 54 Clarence Street, which was Referred to as Sarah Gillingham’s house and Joyce lived there, implying it was in her name, not his.

Sydney Gazette, 21 November 1835:
Sarah Gillingham -I live at No. 54, Clarence-street ; two men came to my house on a Saturday night with some shoes they wanted to sell ; I think Scott and Smith are the men, but I cannot be certain; to the best of my opinion they are the men ; they offered me a pair of shoes, and I said, ” They are not your own ;” 1 said so because they were a fine pair of gentlemen’s shoes, and the men appeared poor men ; ono of tho men said, ” You need not be afraid for he has been a gentleman’s servant, and having left his place he wants to get a thick pair of shoes lo go up the country with, and will come again and repurchase the thin ones;” I gave them a pair of shoes in exchange for them, and 1 saw those shoes afterwards at the Police Office.
Cross-examined by Scott-To the best of my knowledge you are the man who put the shoes on ; you were in the house, standing at the counter.
Cross-examined By Smith   You know I keep a shop; you know, very well, that I sell things.

SARAH GILLINGHAM was not highly regarded. Her low moral approach to life was described variously in the newspapers:

Sydney Gazette 6 January 1838
Sarah Gillingham prosecutrix against John Griffin who she accused of stealing what out of her shop. Newspaper referred to the shameful prevarication of all the witnesses; the chairman told the jury that little reliance could be placed upon the testimony of the witnesses and he was acquitted without leaving the box.
21/11/1835, 5/6/1832, “The Colonist’5

* keeping “a a low pawnbroking establishment, in Clarence Street” (16/1/1838, The Australian)

*  “a regular pest to society and ready to receive any thing which may be carried to her by assigned servants, who can at any time ” raise the wind” by applying to her.” (16/1/1838 Syd Gazette)

* a “well-known pawnbroker”  (22/2/1839 Syd Gazette)

* Mrs Joyce alias Sarah Gillingham a “notorious pawnbroker”; (Syd Monitor, 6/4/1840)

* that in giving evidence to court “ there cannot be the slightest doubt that this old wretch swore most falsely,” (the Colonist, 11/4/1840)

The Colonist 11 April 1840
PREVARICATION. - In our last we noticed the examination at the Police Office of the old woman Gillingham, alias Joyce, on a charge of perjury. On being brought up to the Quarter Sessions, to which she was remanded to be dealt with, she   was ordered to be imprisoned for three calendar months. Now there cannot be the slightest doubt that this old wretch swore most falsely, and that wilfully, we cannot, therefore, make the distinction which Captain Innes did, but, on the other hand, we think it is very probable that had she been committed to take her trial for perjury, she would not have been convicted by a Jury, and would therefore have escaped punishment altogether. Perjury and rape appear to be considered of little consequence in the low class of people of this colony. As for perjury, any one may hear the grossest falsehoods most solemnly attested in the streets every day, and these people care nothing about a book, of the contents of which they are totally ignorant, or wilfully careless. We do not think any punishment too severe for perjury, and could almost wish the statutes of old were in force with regard to this offence.  We rarely ever, see, or hear, the oath properly administered. This is another great fault. If the swearer were impressed so far as he was capable of being so, with the solemnity of the obligation he was about to impose upon himself, he would have more dread of violating truth, whether he actually cared for the Gospel or not.

The Colonist 5 December 1840
A confederate of the notorious woman Gillingham alias Joyce was yesterday fined 10s for purchasing a pair of shoes from a man belonging to one of the government gangs.  It may be well for these people and their like to know, that under the same clause, under which Joyce was fined, they may on a second conviction, be publicly whipped, once or more, at the discretion of the convicting magistrate.

30 May 1845 - Gillingham or Joyce were called on in a notice to redeem a watch they’d left with W Beazley in Clarence Street more than twelve months before - i.e. they’d pawned it themselves (SMH 30/5/1845)

2 May 1846
Mary Nowlan stole two pairs of trousers from Michael Joyce’s shop, dealer of Clarence Street and Sarah “Mrs Joyce” missed them immediately. Michael went chasing, even in his old age,  All the accused would say to the court was that Michael Joyce was “a horrid old rogue”

Sarah Gillingham died in 1850 “age 70” as Sarah Joyce (NSW BDM)
Michael Joyce had pre-deceased her, in 1847.

Shane Wright on 31st January, 2015 wrote of James Wright:

James, who appears to have been a landholder in Dublin before transportation, became a landholder in the Parramatta district as well as overseeing the Government Domain there. He married Eliza Mackey, a London prostitute/thief who had been sentenced to death in 1818. She was about six months pregnant. They had four children - Susannah, John (Jack), James and Samuel. John would go on to become a bushranger in the Bathurst district known as “Jack the Native”. James ended up running a pub called The Cottage in the Grove on the Parramatta Road on the eastern side of the Duck River. He died in 1830.

Thomas Towe on 31st January, 2015 wrote of Helena Towe:

i assume a relation of mine my father originated from rock lane aghagallon close to aghalee

Robin Sharkey on 30th January, 2015 wrote of Michael Joyce:

Michael Joyce’s was not actually a baker himself, but he ran a baking business from 1822 until about 1829 or 1830 when he ran into severe financial difficulties, took out a large mortgage, prosecuted a good friend for theft, lost his George STreet allotment in a sheriff’s sale for debt and probably his Castlereagh St bakery premises to his mortgagee.  He then became entangled in his “Wife” Sarah Gillingham’s pawnbroking/buying and selling business in the 1830’s and 1840’s and had many small scrapes with the law after keeping his nose clean from 1810 until 1830. He died in 1847 and she died in 1850.
His reported ages were sometimes wildly inconsistent:
*  Age 34 in Nov 1810 according to the ship’s indent prepared when he left Ireland
* Based on age 54 in Nov 1828 Census he would have been aged 36 in 1810. 
* Based on the age he stated (51) in an 1837 jail entry record he would have been only 25 on departure from Ireland; in 1837 he had white hair and around this time was often referred to as an old man so perhaps in 1837 he WAS actually about 60 years as per 1810 stated age.
* Based on his age (87 yrs) reported at death in 1847 (probably exaggerated by Sarah his wife) he would have been 51 on Irish departure. However, based on his reported age of 34 in 1810 he would have been only 71 on his death.
Most likely he was 34 in 1810 when departing since this fits best with Sarah Gillingham’s age being similar, and is consistent with his 1828 age.
* His 1817 petition for emancipation said he was “in charge of the Toll-gates Sydney“. He Was recommended by John Thomas Campbell (Gov’s Secretary) and John Harris of Ultimo.
His 1820 memorial (Petition) requested land saying he was “…most anxious to enter into the farming concerns of the Colony …”  and Macquarie wrote “40 acres” on the side of it,  This 40 acres was never “located” or occupied by him, no actual land grant materialised. In the 1840’s he wrote several petitions seeking the 40 acres promised to him in 1820.

COMMON LAW WIFE
Michael Joyce set up at least by 1822 Muster with Englishwoman \ Sarah Gillingham [see her separate entry] who arrived on ‘Northampton” in 1815 as Sarah Broadbent, alias Gillingham. She had a 14 year sentence from the Old Bailey for receiving stolen goods in her shop somewhere near Holborn in London.  She got a Ticket of Leave No 1133 [unknown date] and her Certificate of Freedom was no 28/0826 dated 22 September 1828,  SRNSW 4/4294; Reel 983

Michael Joyce and Sarah Gillingham stayed together for the rest of their lives, not married to each other, not always happily.  In her trial she was referred to as “Mrs Gillingham” so probably was married in England. She was sometimes referred to as his housekeeper, but was clearly always living as his wife. Later in the 1840’s she was increasingly referred to as Mrs Joyce.

Sarah died in 185o “age 70” outliving Michael Joyce by three years,

BAKING BUSINESS

* He ran a baking business after emancipation but his trade was chandler, not a baker.
He owned a block of land in George Street at Brickfield Hill where he first carried on his baking business (at least by Nov 1822 muster).
- February 1822 was the first record of a Gov Servant being assigned to him:  John Carr per “Daphne”, still his GS in 1823 Muster.
30/6/1823 assigned a baker by trade named John Daley (per “Brampton”), still there in October 1824 (mechanics’ defaulters list) but John Daley had his own baking business in Harrington Street by 1828 Census

* On 30 June 1823 he took a long lease of 21 years on 206 Castlereagh Street and moved his baking business there. (NSW RGs - Registers of Land Grants & Leases)
* He rented out his George Street premises to John or James Ryan (see ‘Sydney Monitor’ dated 1/10/1834)

mid 1823 to August 1824, John Buxton per “Neptune” worked for him
14 August 1824 Hugh McMahon per “Isabella”, at Castlereagh St premises. McMahon was still there until October 1829 when he absconded (Syd gazette 15th, 20, 27th October 1829)
John Riley, Baker by Trade, about mid 1825 for nearly three years (per Syd Gazette 21/11/1829 page 2). Riley left Joyce’s employ because Joyce laid a charge of robbery against him and although he was acquitted, Riley refused to go back and work for him (See Sydney Gazette evidence Joyce Vs Rochford, 21 November 1829). Riley was listed at Joyce’s employ in 1828 but was also listed as having a Ticket of Exemption (from Joyce’s) and being a labourer on Road Party 15 at Parramatta.

1825 Fined for selling short-weight bread [ Police Fines received June- Sept 1825’;  Syd Gazette 30/6/1825]

LEASED PREMISES

In 1821 he was granted long leases over 2 neighbouring premises in Kent Street- no 52 and 54 Kent.  Official Lease document granted 30/6/1821.  One was tenanted by fellow “Providence” Convict “Jerry” Leonard at the time possession was granted to Joyce (see Syd Gaz 21/11/1829(

MORTGAGE AND DEBT
?From 1829 things started going badly wrong for Michael Joyce. Each month, from August 1829 to January 1830 something terrible happened to hi:

In August 1828 he’d taken a smallish mortgage from his friend Charles Nemo (Irish, FbyS aged 56 in 1828)  over his long lease on the Castlereagh Street bakery premises.  £58 2s 6d in Sterling Bank notes.
In September 1828 he realised that the two Lease Documents for his tenements in Kent Street were missing from the box where they were usually kept; he had last seen them in August 1827 after having had them at a solicitor’s. (Syd Gazette 21/11/1829, page 2)
He believed that his good friend, John Rochford, who he treated “like a son” had taken the leases without consent and attempted to sell them to Patrick Taafe. This killed his friendship with Rochford!  (Syd Gazette 21/11/1829, page 2)
His lender Nemo/Nimmo died a year later in August 1829 and Joyce would have had to pay the loan back.
He already was in debt elsewhere. A Mr Stephen (one of the legal family?) had proved a debt against him in court which he had not paid
On 1st September 1829 Mr Stephen took a writ of execution out against Joyce instructing the Supreme Court Sheriff to execute against the goods of Joyce to the sum of £151.  (See Sydney Monitor 1 Oct 1834 re Porter Vs McQuoid)
in October 1829 Joyce’s Government Servant of 5 years (since May 1824) - Hugh McMahon - who worked in the bakery, absconded.  This may have been due to the financial situation, perhaps by them Joyce was no longer able to keep the bakery going. (see Syd Gaz Oct 2nd, Oct 27th 1829)
On 19th November 1829 the trial of John Rochford over the leases, instigated by Joyce as Prosecutor, commenced, the charge being theft of the paper on which the Deeds of Lease were written. This was a novel approach.  Much personal testimony about people was given, Taafe’s testimony that Rochford tried to sell the documents to him was undermined by a string of witnesses who accused Taafe of being untrustworthy. The character of Sarah Gillingham was much impugned, though she gave evidence that her money also contributed to paying off the loan on the Kent St properties. In the end, John Rochford was acquitted.  All Joyce got was big legal costs for lawyer Mr Therry who prosecuted fthe matter or him.
On 17 November 1829 (right before the trial started)  Joyce took out a new mortgage over the Castlereagh St bakery premises, this time for the very large sum of £300 in November 1829, from Thomas Roberts.  Terms were harsh -  interest was £20 for every £100 paid on the mortgage, payable each six months. (See RG register of Land Grant & Memorandums Register)
Joyce apparently failed to use any of the £300 mortgage monies advanced to pay off the Court Judgement debt to Mr Stephen because the sheriff proceeded to sell his George Street Property at Brickfield Hill, on 30 January 1830, in execution of the writ.
AT the Sheriff’s auction sale, James (or John?) Ryan objected to the sale saying he had a lease of the premise from Joyce. He proved this to the Sheriff by producing the Lease document.  Nevertheless, the George St premises was sold then and there by the Sheriff to Mr Porter, who paid a deposit, but James Ryan refused to give up possession. Porter sued the Sheriff in 1834 to get his deposit back - the Sheriff had pad the deposit straight to Joyce’s creditor, Mr Stephen.

BUSINESS & FRIENDSHIP LOSS

These months from August 1829 to January 1830 must have been very stressful for Joyce.
It is likely he lost his business in this period.
By 1834 he was no longer living in his Kent Street premises, but was described as living in the home of Sarah Gillingham at 54 Clarence Street. (Syd Gazette, 21/11/1835)

There George Street property sale debacle caused a rift between Joyce and James Ryan. In 1840 “Thomas Ryan” lodged a claim with the Land Commissioners (over George Street??) which was opposed by Michael Joyce. (Sydney Herald 13/11/1840). The decision was in favour of Thomas Ryan   (Sydney Herald 8/4/1841). The following year, Ryan was charged with assaulting Michael Joyce “with a naked sword” and was in the Hyde Park Barracks. (The Australian, 1/8/1842)

In 1831 Sarah Gillingham petitioned against Joyce for insolvency - presumably on basis of money she had loaned to assist, ot perhaps on money she had contributed towards the rent to Government on the Kent Street properties.  (Sydney Monitor, 26 March 1831)

JOYCE as SMALL-TIME “DEALER”

by the early 1830’s Joyce was now often in trouble with the police over small receiving/stealing matters.
Sarah Gillingham had for year run a pawn-brokers shop out of the old Castlereagh St premises, and now out of Clarence Street, which sh erefered to as dealing and buying and trading.  But a pawnbrokers it clearly was.  Joyce was charged with:

1830 - Breach of the peace (perhaps over the sale of the George Street property) (Sydney Jail Entrance Book)
1832 - “Assaulting” the window shutter of Mary Ryan, together with Sarah “Gillman” (Syd Gaz 5th June 1832)
1834 - stealing tools of carpenter Morris Castle, who found them on Joyce’s premises -remanded before magistrates for examination (Syd Herald, 8/5/1834)

1835 - receiving stolen property, together with Mary Ann Cook (or Mack)
1835, 22 January - Jail Entrance Book, aged 71 years, for trial.  Remained in jail until August 1835 when charges for receiving stolen property, against him and Mary Ann Cook, were finally let out of jail on their own recognisance until trial.
1834, November - he and Sarah both gave testimony in a trial of two men for robbery that one of the accused had tried to sell a pair of boots to them in their shop. Joyce could have only been released from jail a couple of weeks.  A policeman said of Joyce’s evidence:  “Joyce was very confused and uncertain at the Police Office, first pointing out one, then another of the prisoners, and that his testimony was not worthy of belief.”

1837 Jail Entrance Book - crei not stated. “Aged 71 years, born 1766” (too old based on being 34 in 1810). WHITE hair. florid complexion, still 6 feet tall.
1838 - 1839 - Sarah Gillingham appears in many court cases either brazenly falsely claiming thing of hers to be stolen by other people or having received stolen property.  See her separate entry under ship “Northumberland” for details,

The Colonist 5 December 1840
A confederate of the notorious woman Gillingham alias Joyce was yesterday fined 10s for purchasing a pair of shoes from a man belonging to one of the government gangs.  It may be well for these people and their like to know, that under the same clause, under which Joyce was fined, they may on a second conviction, be publicly whipped, once or more, at the discretion of the convicting magistrate.

* and from the Australian (8/12/1840) for the same court incident: “Joyce was very insolent on leaving the Court, declaring that he would nut pay the fine, but that he would appeal to another Court to have the matter finally settled.”

30 May 1845 - Gillingham or Joyce were called on in a notice to redeem a watch they’d left with W Beazley in Clarence Street more than twelve months before - i.e. they’d pawned it themselves (SMH 30/5/1845)

2 May 1846
Mary Nowlan stole two pairs of trousers from Michael Joyce’s shop, dealer of Clarence Street and Sarah “Mrs Joyce” missed the m immediately. Michael went chasing, even in his old age,  All she would say to the court was that Michael Joyce was “a horrid old rogue”

SRAH GILLINGHAM’s low moral approach to life was described variously in the newspapers:

*“little reliance could be placed upon the testimony of [Gillingham]  (6/1/1838, Syd Gazette)

* keeping “a a low pawnbroking establishment, in Clarence Street” (16/1/1838, The Australian)

*  “a regular pest to society and ready to receive any thing which may be carried to her by assigned servants, who can at any time ” raise the wind” by applying to her.” (16/1/1838 Syd Gazette)

* a “wellknown pawnbroker”  (22/2/1839 Syd Gazette)

* Mrs Joyce alias Sarah Gillingham a “notorious pawnbroker”; (Syd Monitor, 6/4/1840)

* that in giving evidence to court “ there cannot be the slightest doubt that this old wretch swore most falsely,” (the Colonist, 11/4/1840)

D Wong on 30th January, 2015 wrote of John Dallenger:

30/6/1835: TOL Patrick Plains
20/7/1836: TOL cancelled for being absent from his district - Patrick Plains

27/7/1836: Apprehended after absconding from Newcastle Gaol.

10/11/1836: Burial date: died at Newcastle Gaol.

D Wong on 30th January, 2015 wrote of John Jobson:

John Jobson was 31 years old when transported along with his brother-in-law, John Challis, also on board.

Father: William Jobson, Mother: Mary Bassett.

John was married in England to Sophia Dyson (D 1841) and they had 5 children, Charles 1830, Mary Ann 1832, Samuel 1835, William 1835, Aaron 1837.

1845: TOL Port Macquarie
22/7/1846: COF

19/1/1856: Married Anne Chapman (1825-1893) they had 3 children, Thomas 1856, John Henry 1859, William Joseph 1862.

27/7/1885: John died at Mitchell’s Island (Taree NSW) aged 78.

Teresa Sheridan on 30th January, 2015 wrote of James Sawyer:

On Tuesday evening last, Charles Powell, the Fittleton carrier, was robbed and desperately beaten by two men belonging to Figheldean, names Samuel Sawyer and Silas Batchelor, the former of whom has been fully committed for trial, while the latter having escaped from custody, a reward has been offered for his apprehension.  Powell lies dangerously ill.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal Monday 2 November 1835
Committed to Fisherton Gaol:        Samuel Sawyer, charged with having feloniously assaulted and beaten Charles Powell, on the highway, and stolen from his person several pieces of silver money, his property, at Figheldean.   
Salisbury and Winchester Journal Monday 2 November 1835
The Trial
James Sawyer was indicted for assaulting and robbing Charles Powell of Figheldean.
Charles Powell deposed: I live at Fittleton and am a carrier to Salisbury Market.  I went to Salisbury on the 27th October last.  On going from Salisbury to Fittleton you pass Potter’s Lane which leads to Figheldean.  On my return I turned down that lane, about half past seven o’clock.  A person ran up to the horses and said “Powell, I have dropped a knife”.  I was in the wagon with the reins in my hand: there was a woman in the wagon.  I told the person to move out of the way, gave the horses a cut with the whip and drove on.  When I had proceeded half a furlong, I heard some one doing something at the tail of the wagon.  I jumped out and ran round to see what was the matter.  I then found two persons, one of whom was the person who had stopped me before.  It was a very light evening: the moon was up: one of them was the prisoner, and I called him by name, saying, “Sawyer, what do you want? I knew him well: he lived at Figheldean.  They said they “were doing nothing at present”.  I said “Walk on then and leave the wagon alone.”  One of them replied, “Damn thee! I’ll let thee know: and I was directly knocked down with a stick.  My head bled.  Prisoner jumped on my breast bone with his knees, and struck me several blows on the forehead.  I begged for mercy, and said I would give them all I had if they would let me get up.  The other man lay across my legs.  The more I begged for mercy the more the prisoner repeated the blows, and all in one place.  I was blind for three weeks after.  My head was cut open.  I cried “Murder!” they continued ill using me till I could speak no more.  I had 9s in my pocket.  When I came to myself my pocket was turned inside out, and the money was gone.  I felt a hand in my pocket when I was down.  I said, “Lord have mercy on me! I shall die, and Manning (another carrier) will come by and pick me up”.  The prisoner gave me another blow: One then said “Is he dead?” and the other said “Yes” and they then left me.  I heard them go across Mr Mills’s fallows, in the direction of the church.  My horses were gone on.  I have never been able to work since.  I vomit blood in consequence of the injury I received in my chest.
Other confirmatory evidence having been produced, the prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to be transported for life.  Batchelor has absconded.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal Monday 14 March 1836

D Wong on 29th January, 2015 wrote of John Gorman:

John Gorman was born C1766, or 1775, or 1772~according to his death certificate.

Colonial Secretary:
GORMAN, John. Per “Lord Sidmouth”, 1821

1825 Mar 1: Servant of Thomas Gorman of Macquarie Street, Parramatta; attestation as to his character for a ticket of leave (Reel 6027; 4/1716.2 p.184)

John was about 55 on arrival, no crime details available, born Meath County.

1825: TOL

21/8/1827: COF

26/7/1833: Married Judith Breslaw/Breslan (Forth 1830).

1842: NSW BDM - died aged 70.

D Wong on 29th January, 2015 wrote of Judith Breslaw:

Judith is listed as Judith BRESLAW on all records except for http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/convicts.htm
where she is listed as BRESLAN.

Judith was 30 years old on arrival and was transported for ‘Stealing shirts’.  She was single and her native place was Meath County.

26/7/1833: Married John Gorman (Lord Sidmouth 1821) at St Phillips, Sydney.

25/1/1837: COF

John Gorman died in 1842, Sydney.  Nothing further found on Judith.

D Wong on 29th January, 2015 wrote of William Acres:

William Acres was 21 years old on arrival.  He was single and his native place was Tipperary County.

1835: Assigned to J P McQueen, Invermein.

15/8/1842: COF

Michael ENGLAND on 29th January, 2015 wrote of Godfrey White:

Godfrey Freeman WHITE was born in Birmingham, but was living in London when, aged 17yr, he stole gold pins and a watch from a dwelling house. He was identified, convicted and exiled. He married Mary Ann MAIDMENT at East Brisbane 15Jan1853. They had 6 children while they lived in Brisbane, before moving in 1866 to Maryborough, where another two children were born. He was a successful businessman and served on the Maryborough Town Council. (submitted by GtGdSo)

D Wong on 29th January, 2015 wrote of Edmund Dooling:

Edmund Dooling was 27 years old on arrival.  He was 5’9 ½” tall, brown hair, blue eyes, full face, fresh complexion, stout.  Listed as single.

29/7/1854: TOL
11/10/1856 CP

No marriage found on the WA BDM but he married Mary ??? and they had 2 daughters, Annie and Margaret Mary (also not listed on the births index).

The following is an extract from http://inherit.stateheritage.wa.gov.au/Public/Inventory/Details/6db535ae-08bb-4806-a154-61b24a08b008
Downa House & Graveyard -  Shire of Gingin - 7 Gingin Rd Gingin
Also called Willowbrook Farm. 

Edmund and Mary Dooling bought the Swan locations, 545, 547 & 551 in the 1860’s and they named their land “Downa.” In approximately 1874, they engaged a professional builder, probably Matt Wallis who had built the Junction Hotel the year before, to erect a substantial mud bat shingle roofed house, which still stands by the Nolan’s bridge. The roof has been replaced with iron.

After the deaths of Edmund Dooling in 1894 and his wife in 1912, Michael Nolan who had married their daughter, Annie Dooling, acquired the property. They settled at Downa in 1913. A public telephone was installed at Downa on the 15th March 1929. Miss Nolan operated the telephone exchange from this date until May 1946 when the Manual Exchange closed.

James Kinnaird on 29th January, 2015 wrote of Thomas Kinnaird:

Ticket of Leave - 26 May 1846.
Certificate of Freedom - 8Jun 1847

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