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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

Goal: 100 500 1,500 3,310 New Convicts

A big thanks to everyone who contributed a convict - we reached our original target of 100 new convicts in less than a month, and have had an amazing 3,004 new convicts added in total!

Our current goal of 3,611 is special in that it means we will have discovered roughly 1 in 10 convicts who were missing from the original records!

If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 33,108 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

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Goal: 15,000 Contributions

By contributing you will bring the community a step closer to a goal of 15,000 contributions. We currently have 11,179 contributions.

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Recent Submissions

Pauline Portelli on 24th July, 2014 wrote of Elizabeth Lyons:

Elizabeth Lyons only had 3 marriages (not G Drury)
and died in 1874.  I have researched her extensively and my facts are correct.

D Wong on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Michael Culhane:

Michael Culhane was 28 years old on arrival in VDL, he was transported for “Common assault and stealing fire arms”.

Michael could read & write a little,  was single, RC,  5’6 3/4”  dark complexion, dark brown hair and whiskers, hazel eyes.

b. james (america), daniel, patrick (america); s. margaret, catherine, mary np.

1/10/1853: was a Constable in Hobart.

17/10/1854: TOL
28/8/1855: CP

1861: was mining up the Crooked River, Victoria.

Mary Kirk age 21, sailed from Plymouth on March 27th 1869 on board the sailing ship Gresham and arrived in Melbourne on the 24th June 1869.
She married Michael on 30 December 1869 in Gippsland.
They had 10 children.

Jillian Stella on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Joseph Foots:

Joseph Foots was Baptised on 31.12.1820 at St.John the Baptist Church in the Parish of Sedlescombe County of East Sussex (report supplied by Sussex Family History Group) and he died on or about 15.10.1865 according to his death certificate, an accurate date could not be supplied as he died on the ranges about 1 1/2 miles from Howqua Station, he was found in a decaying state.

D Wong on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Matthew Lacey:

Matthew Lacey was 25 years old on arrival in NSW, he was single.

1838: TOL Merton
22/4/1839: TOL Passport, Merton Bench
25/7/1839: TOL Passport, Merton Bench
24/8/1841: COF

1841: Married Bridget Esther Flanagan – they had 8 children.

25/3/1863: Sydney Morning Herald:
On the morning of the 24th March, at his residence, Cooper- street, Strawberry Hills, Mr. Matthew Lacey, in the 56th year of his age, leaving a wife and eight children to deplore their loss. Mr. Lacey was a native of Ireland, for which country he cherished an ardent love ; he was also an old colonist of New South Wales, in the promotion of whose political and social welfare he took an active part. His integrity, generosity, and geniality endeared him to the hearts of all who knew him. May be rest in peace.

16/2/1891 Sydney Morning Herald:
LACEY.—February 14, at her residence, Brent House, Lambert-street, McDonaldtown, Bridget Esther, relict of the late Matthew Lacey, aged 72 years.

D Wong on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of John Tighe:

John Tighe’s made four attempts to bring his family to New South Wales between 1841 and 1853 and is another example in determination. The family was eventually reunited in 1858, 25 years after John had left Sligo.

From the 9th Irish Famine Memorial:

Feeny was writing in August 1848 to John Tighe of Wollongong, New South Wales. John
Had applied under an Imperial government scheme administered by New South Wales as a time expired convict—he had been transported in 1833 from County Sligo for manslaughter—to have his wife Margaret and daughters Honora and Mary brought to the colony. He had also contacted Caroline Chisholm who had persuaded the British Colonial
Secretary, Earl Grey, to re-establish a scheme, dropped in 1840 at the cessation of transportation to Sydney, to reunite convict families. As Feeny penned in his letter from the parish of Riverstown, County Sligo, possibly in the presbytery, he said this in a postscript:
Your wife is at my side while I write this letter: She requests me to send you her most
affectionate love—she has never forgotten you and never shall—the children also have desired their fondest love to you.

In the body of this letter Feeny outlined the family’s situation. They had been evicted from their small cabin in the townland of Heapstown along with all the other smallholders. They had been taken in by Margaret Tighe’s brother Pat McDonough and were living with him in the townland of Annaghcarty, but ‘in very poor circumstances’. Any financial help John could send from Australia would be welcomed. John’s brother, Hugh, had left the previous year for New York from which place Feeny had received a letter from him telling of Hugh’s safe arrival. The priest also remembered the time—probably in mid 1847, ‘Black ’47’ again—when a letter had come from Caroline Chisholm in London offering the family free passage to Sydney from London but they were not able to get there in time. Another offer came to sail on the Waverley, a ship contracted to carry female convicts from Dublin to Hobart. This time the family was ‘in the fever, some of them recovering slowly, others in thecommencement of it’. No other offer came from Caroline Chisholm, Feeny reminded John in Wollongong of the ‘great poverty and distress in this country for the last two years’ and painted a terrible prospect for the parishes of south Sligo in the coming year: the potato crop is entirely blighted in this district and the accounts from all parts of Ireland as we read in the newspapers confirm the sad prospect. It was a prospect John could read about in Wollongong
as similar accounts were printed in the Sydney press and it is no surprise that John’s name turns up on those lists of subscribers to Irish famine relief published in those same papers.

25/10/1885: John Tighe died at Keelogues, Wollongong aged 88.

Wife Margaret McDonough was born in 1812 and died 12/8/1880 at Keelogues, Wollongong aged 68.

Nicole Maloney on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Michael Culhane:

Michael Joseph Culhane - arrested at age 14 with Patrick Dempsey, John Hennesy and Michael Nash in Limerick Ireland and transported to Van Diemen’s Land for seven years. Later married Mary Kirk and settled in Talbotville, Victoria as a goldminer. Michael and Mary had 10 children. If you have any additional information - I can be contacted at nicole_cuce@hotmail.com - I am Michael’s great, great granddaughter.

D Wong on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Thomas Coffee:

Thomas Coffee was 36 years old on arrival in NSW.
Thomas was born in Clonmel, Tipperary County and was single.

18/7/1840: Convict Death Register - Thomas died at the Bathurst Hospital.

D Wong on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Samuel Buff:

Samuel Buff was 23 years old on arrival in NSW.
He was born in Chester, England.

Found no records of him in Australia.

Christine Verschoor on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Thomas Timms:

Married Margaret O’Barrow 24-10-1841 at St. Francis Church Melbourne. Children Mary Ann, Anastasia, Alicea, Margaret, William, Vincent. Buried at Hawksdale, Victoria.

Andrew Jones on 23rd July, 2014 wrote of Michael Brennan:

Michael Brennan is My 4x great grandfather, through his son Patrick and his granddaughter Elizabeth Catherine Brennan. Andrew Jones Blue Mountains

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of John Carey Willis:

04/03/1836: Newcastle, NSW:      Prisoner in iron gang charged with insolence and fighting at the works. Sentenced to 100 lashes.
(Recorded under name ‘John Carey’.)

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of John Carey Willis:

John Willis was transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ‘Parmelia’ arriving 1834.

1837: aged 22yrs. Assigned to J. Broughton, Paterson district.

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of John Warden:

John Warden was transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ‘Parmelia’ arriving 1834.

1837: aged 33 yrs, assigned to Wm Innes, Paterson district.
20/09/1842: Granted Ticket of Leave. Maitland district.

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Matthew Smith:

Matthew Smith was transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ‘Parmelia’ arriving 1834.

1837: aged 23yrs, assigned to Wm Innes, Paterson district.
24/07/1839: Granted Ticket of Leave. Maitland district.
17/05/1842: Newcastle, NSW. Matthew Smith,  Martin Mangin, James Wilson and Samuel Cordwell all admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland charged with burlgary. To be sent for trial.

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Marcus Mcdonnell:

Marcus McDonnell was transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ‘Parmelia’ arriving 1834.

Application for permission to marry, in 1842 at East Maitland, NSW to Catherine Maloney (aged 21yrs, arrived free on ‘Livingstone’) - Granted.

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of John Tighe:

John Tighe was transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ‘Parmelia’ 1834.

There is a record in the Colonial Office of John applying to bring his family out to the Colony, in 1841 when he was ‘free by servitude’.

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Thomas Baldwin:

Thomas Baldwin was transported on the ‘Parmelia’ 1833 to New South Wales, Australia.  He was ill on the voyage, admitted to hospital in Sydney and died a few days later. Aged 62 yrs.

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of John Sullivan:

John Sullivan was convicted at Middlesex, England and given a 7yr sentence. Transported on the ‘Parmelia’ for New South Wales, Australia, however he died during the voyage, on 30/08/1832 (the ship arrived Nov 1832).

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Roger Sims:

Roger Sims was convicted at Stafford and given a Life Sentence. Transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ‘Parmelia’ 1832, however he died on the voyage out - in August 1832 (the ship arrived Nov 1832).

Carol Axton-Thompson on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of John Keogh:

John Keogh was convicted at Co. Roscommon, Ireland in 1833 for assault & robbery. Life sentence. Transported to New South Wales, Australia on the ‘Parmelia’ arriving 02/03/1834.

Time served at Norfolk Island & New South Wales.

D Wong on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Rebecca Bearance:

Rebecca Barence along with her sister Elizabeth BARENCE, (also spelt Bearance, Barance, Barnes) was sentenced to transportation for stealing a quantity of muslin.
They came from Tiverton, Devon.

According to shipping records, Rebecca was born 1781.

No records found of Rebecca on the NSW Gov. Records.

The NSW BDM record a death of a Rebecca Barnes in 1820.
No proof this was her, but found no other information on Rebecca.

D Wong on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Elizabeth Bearance:

Elizabeth BARENCE, born 5 September 1788, Tiverton, Devon - (also spelt Bearance, Barance, Barnes) who with her sister Rebecca was sentenced to transportation for stealing a quantity of muslin.

20/3/l1829: COF

29/7/1816: Married Charles Wilkins (Baring 1815)
at St Philips Church of England, Sydney – listed as Elizabeth Barnes on NSW BDM. They had 4/5 children.

Charles Wilkins became the victualler of ‘Somerset House’ corner of George & Kent Streets, Sydney until about 1837.  Charles died 6/1/1839.

On the 15th November, 1839,t her residence, Kent-street south, after along illness, Mrs. Elizabeth Wilkins, widow of the late Charles Wilkins, of Brickfield Hill, George-street, where they resided many years.

D Wong on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Charles Wilkins:

CHARLES WILKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July, a gelding, value 17 l. the property of James Kill .

Prisoner’s Defence. I was very much in liquor when I hired the horse; when I came round from my journey at Bow I tumbled off the horse; the next morning I was so tipsey I did not know how to walk. I did not mean to part with the horse.
GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

Charles and Elizabeth (per Mary Ann 1815) were married 29 July, 1816 at St Philips Church of England, Sydney – listed as Elizabeth Barnes on NSW BDM.

In the 1828 census, Charles was a blacksmith in George Street Sydney.

1831: was a licensed victualler and had “Somerset House”, at the corner of Kent and George streets, Sydney.

8/1/1839 Sydney Gazette:
On the 6th instant, Mr. Charles Wilkins, of George-street Sydney, aged 47 years, after a long and severe illness.

28/5/1839 Sydney Gazette:
MARRIED,
By Special License at St. James’ Church, on Thursday, the 23rd instant, by the Rev. Mr. Walsh, Mr. Frederick Stewart, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of the late Mr. Charles Wilkins, both of George-street, Sydney.

3/12/1839 Sydney Gazette:
On the 15th November, 1839,  at her residence, Kent-street south, after along illness, Mrs. Elizabeth Wilkins, widow of the late Charles Wilkins, of Brickfield Hill, George-street, where they resided many years.

D Wong on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of Thomas Cashon:

Thomas Cashon was listed as Carshon on NSW Gov. Records.  He was 21 years old and single and his native place was Tipperary. His crime was listed as “Grevious Assault”.

24/6/1834: Convict Death Register - died at Liverpool, aged 21. Listed as Carshon.

NSW BDM - Listed as Kershaw.

D Wong on 22nd July, 2014 wrote of John Kennedy:

John Kennedy was 18 years old and single.

1839: TOL Windsor
3/11/1841: COF
8/11/1845: COF renewed.

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