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Recent Submissions

Nell Murphy on 7th December, 2016 wrote of John Cadby:

John CADBY was convicted at Wiltshire on 15 Aug 1840 for highway robbery. 15yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Lady Raffles’ 17 March 1841.

Single man; aged 32yrs; farm labourer; 5’8”; Protestant; can read a little.
Native Place: Trowbridge, Wiltshire.
2 Brothers: Hayman & James (recorded on Indent)
1 sister - Matilda

2year Probation Period in the Colony - sent to Fingal.
1842: Remarks - “orderly, good and industrious”.
1843: assigned to Mr. Robert Blyth, Sorell.
1846: Misconduct. 2mths hard labour.
1 June 1847: Ticket of Leave granted.
17 July 1856: Conditional Pardon approved.

Application for Permission to Marry:
30 Nov 1845: John Cadby (Lady Raffles) to Hannah Roberts (Emma Eugenia). Approved.

Marriage:
12 Jan 1846 John CADBY to Hannah ROBERTS, at St. George’s Church, Sorell (Hobart district). John aged 35yrs, labourer. Hannah aged 20yrs, spinster. (Ref. 37/1/5 no. 147)

Child:
Hamen CADLY (Cadby) b. 1 May 1846 to John CADLY and Hannah JONES at Richmond. (Ref. 33/1/28 no. 947).
Hayman CADBY was admitted to Queens Orphanage on 8 Aug 1850, aged 4yrs 3mths. Discharged 13 July 1860 to William Carter, New Town (employer). Returned to Orphanage 13 Nov 1861. Discharged 7 Feb 1862 to Thomas Watson, Swansea (employer). No details on this reference as to his parents. Suffered from ill health. (Ref. SWD28, SWD32/1, CSD25/6, CSD25/2/7789

Thomas CADLY (Cadby) b. 4 Sept 1847 at Richmond. Father John Cadley. Mother Hannah Jones. (Ref. 33/1/28 no. 997)

Matilda CADBY (but indexed as CADLY)b. 28 Dec 1856 at Perth (district of Longford) to John Cadby and Hannah Roberts. (ref. 33/1/34 no. 978)

Iris Dunne on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Matthew Brady:

Buried in the Old Roman Catholic Cemetery in Hobart, Tasmania

Iris Dunne on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Matthew Brady:

Occupation: Soldier / Painter & Glazier
aged 35
Catholic, Married with 3 male children
Native Place: Monaghan Co.
Tried: 15 February 1840
Former Convictions: 4 months
TOL: 45/400

Nell Murphy on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Elizabeth Hendry:

Elizabeth HENDRY was convicted at Aberdeen, Scotland on 19 April 1845 for house breaking and theft. Previous convictions. 7 year transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Lloyds’ arriving 7 Nov 1845. Ship Surgeon’s Report: “Well behaved and industrious - made 29 shirts.”

Aged 30 years; single woman; housemaid; 4’11 1/4”; Protestant; sallow complexion; brown hair; grey eyes.
Native Place - Aberdeen, Scotland.
Brothers: Hughie, William & Peter

6mths Probation Period.
Assigned to work services.
12 April 1847: Absent without leave. 1mth hard labour at the Female Factory, Hobart.
15 May 1849: Ticket of Leave granted.

2 Sept 1850: Marriage to John KIRK (transported per ‘Augusta Jessie’) at St. George’s Church, Hobart. (Ref. 37/1/9 no. 284. Elizabeth name spelt “Henry”)

1 June 1852: Free Certificate

Note on Record: “Enquiries made for this woman by her nephew James Hendry, 70 Has….(?) Court, Gallowgate, Aberdeen, Scotland.”

Link to John Kirk’s record: http://www.convictrecords.com.au/convicts/kirk/john/22710

Robin Sharkey on 7th December, 2016 wrote of John Bennett:

ENGLISH CRIME:

Derby Mercury - Thursday 23 March 1786 page 4, column 3:
“At Shrewsburyy Assizes, which ended on Wednesday last, [ i.e. 15th March] three persons were capitally convicted, and received sentence of death … they were all reprieved before the Judge left town Derby Mercury - Thursday 23 March 1786 page 4, column 3:
At Shrewsburyy Assizes, which ended on Wednesday last, [ i.e. 15th March] three persons were capitally convicted, and received sentence of death Edward Revell and William Terry … and Ann Vaughan … they were all reprieved before the Judge left town [NONE WAS TRANSPORTED TO NSW]

” ______ ... John Bennett for stealing a Box, containing a quantity of Button from a Waggon belonging to Mr James Joy; “

This may have technically been highway robbery if the cart were on the highway.  However, it was not robbery from the person.

JOHN BENNETT was first sent to the Dunkirk Hulk, at the age of 17.  Then he was discharged to the “Friendship” convict sip on 11 March 1787 and sailed on the First Fleet, 14 months after the trial, on ship “Friendship”.

However, he would not last long in the Colony, being executed on 2nd May 1788 for theft of food.

VOYAGE -
The ship sailed on 13th May and 2 weeks later John Bennett was flogged with 37 lashes for breaking out of irons, recorded by Lt Ralph Clark in his diary for 28 May “flog this day” John Bennett, “a young man but an old rogue”.

in November, Bennett was found asleep in the long boat after he’d stolen provisions of other convicts. This time, Ralph Clark wrote ” “Mark my words that we will not have been at Botany above six months before this young Villain…comes to the Gallows”.

ARRIVAL

On 9th February Governor Phillip took some time addressing all the convicts.
Sugeon Worgan recorded inhis dairy that Phillip assured them that thefts would never more be pardoned, but if detected, they should have every justice done them in
in their Trial, and if found Guilty, the Laws should take their Course.

Nevertheless, On 15th February 1788 John Bennett was flogged for theft. Wrote Surgeon Worgan:
“We have had no less than 6 or 7 Trials for petty Larcenies, some were sentenced to be Flogged, and some to be put upon a barren Island, in the Harbour, there to remain for a Week, to live on Bread and Water; These Thefts are generally, of Provisions ...”

Then on 27th February when 3 convicts were found guilty of stealing from the government stores, two were respited, one to be executioner and one to be put on a barren island with bread and water, and the other was hung.  When another four were sentenced to hang for stealing food from the stores, they were reprieved at the last minute, but one was made to agree to be hangman for the colony (named Freeman).

In April, Gov Phillip announced that any further thefts would be met with immediate hanging.

Despite all this, JOHN BENNETT stole again and at the beginning of May was tried, sentenced and hanged all on the same day, the 2nd May 1788.
He had broken into a tent belonging to the “Charlotte” transport ship and stole property from in there above 5s value.

Collins wrote that Bennett ” ... confessed that he had often merited death before he committed the crime for which he was then about to suffer, and that a love of idleness and bad connexions had been his ruin. He was executed immediately on receiving his sentence, in the hope of making a greater impression on the convicts than if it had been delayed for a day or two. “

Surgeon Worgan wrote of him on 5th May “We have had another Execution of a very young Lad but an old hardened Offender, who, on his arrival at the fatal Tree, said, that he was now going to suffer a Death, which he had long deserved.”

ADVICE BACK TO ENGLAND

News of his death was published in English media in 1792, as follows:
Derby Mercury - Thursday 10 May 1792 page 4
“DERBY, May 9th
” Letter [has] been received from Botany Bay, by the keeper of SALOP Gaol, informing him that the following convicts sent from that gaol, are no more, viz:
Margaret Fownes
William Fans [i.e. Evans] Francis Woodcock, Joseph Owen, who have died natural deaths; Richard Carter killed by the natives, and E. Wildblood and John Bennet, hanged for stealing.”

Jenni McTiernan on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Elizabeth Wreay:

Involved in a ‘mutiny’ with several other female convicts and sailors(who were covorting after hours). Reported by James Hall the ship surgeon.Travelled with a child born in gaol. Married William Grose a shoemaker in Parramatta and had 10 more children. Died in 1867.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Philadelphia Pounds:

In the 1806 Muster we find..
[Ref A3558 page 85] Phillis Pounce, Earl Cornwallis, Emancipated, with John Underwood.
[Ref C0955 page 171] Phillis Pounce, Earl Cornwallis, C (Concubine) 1 male 1 female natural (illegitimate) children.

However by the 1814 Muster…
[Ref 6366 page 143] Pounds, Philis, Earl Cornwallis, off stores, Single.

John has moved on again. in 1812 he married Mary Powell who was the daughter of Edward Powell. Powell had initially come to the colony as a seaman on “Lady Juliana” as part of the second Fleet in 1790. He had fathered a child to Sarah Dorset (Second Fleet Convict, 1790, “Lady Juliana”) and then returned to England. In 1793 he returned on the “Bellona” and was married to Mary Fish.

When James Underwood’s new wife, Mary Powell died in 1825, he moved on again and had several further relationships.

Robin Sharkey on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Francis Woodcock:

ENGLISH CRIME:

Derby Mercury - Thursday 18 March 1784 p 4
“DERBY March 25
“At Shrewsbury Assizes which ended on Wednesday the 17th [March] near fifty Prisoners were tried, thirteen of whom were capitally convicted, and received sentence of death, viz -  … and Francis Woodcock & Samuel Grainger, for stealing a wether sheep. the property of the Rev John Chapel Woodhouse”.

The Rev John Chapel Woodhouse was then the minister at Donington, County of Salop. by 1801 Donington parish only had a population of 290 people.

Woodcock’s sentence of death was reprieved, on the basis that he agree to be transported for 14 years.

Samuel Grainger, Woodcock’s co-accused, was one of 144 appearing on orders in council authorising their transportation to NSW on the First Fleet, but who were not embarked, for reasons such as illness, lack of space, last minute petitions & pardons.

When Woodcock died in NSW, information as to it happening was eventually published in the press in England, in the following way:

Derby Mercury - Thursday 10 May 1792 page 4:
“DERBY, May 9th
“Letter has been received from Botany Bay, by the keeper of SALOP Gaol, informing him that the following convicts sent from that gaol, are no more, viz:
Margaret Fownes, William Fans [i.e. Evans] Francis Woodcock, Joseph Owen, who have died natural deaths; Richard Carter killed by the natives, and E. Wildblood and John Bennet, hanged for stealing.”

Robin Sharkey on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Ann Davis:

David Collins, in his ‘An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales [Volume 1]” wrote of her, at page 103, as she was to be executed:
“... acknowledging at that fatal moment which generally gives birth and utterance to truth, that she was about to suffer justly, and that an attempt which she made, when put on her defence, to criminate
another person, (a woman whose character was so notorious that she hoped to establish her own credit and innocence upon her infamy,) as well as her plea of pregnancy, were advanced merely for the purpose of saving her life. She died generally reviled and unpitied by the people of her own description. “

Nell Murphy on 7th December, 2016 wrote of John Kirk:

John KIRK was convicted at York on 12 July 1834 for sheep stealing. Previous offence for poaching. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Augusta Jessie’ arriving January 1835.
Hulk Report & Ship Surgeon’s Report: both good.

Widower, 3 children.
Native Place- Wakefield
Aged 29yrs; coal miner; 5’5 1/2”;brown complexion; brown hair; brown eyes. 

Assigned to work services in the Colony. Several notes of misconduct. Work in the quarries, chains.
7 Jan 1845: Ticket of Leave granted.

13 Aug 1850: Application for Permission to Marry - to Elizabeth HENDRY (transported per Lloyds). Approved.
2 Sept 1850: Marriage - to Elizabeth HENDRY at St. George’s Church, Hobart. John listed as a labourer. (Ref. 37/1/9 no. 284)

Nell Murphy on 7th December, 2016 wrote of John Kirk:

John KIRK was convicted at Edinburgh 2 June 1828. 7yr transportation sentence. Set down to be transported on the ‘Surrey’ for Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) 1829, however note on Tasmanian Archive record “This man did not arrive by the ship - left at Portsmouth”. No details recorded on Description List.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Philadelphia Pounds:

In the colony, Philadelphia married James Underwood (Third Fleet Convict, 1791, “Admiral Barrington”).
James had previously been married to Mary Kendall (Convict, 1792, “Royal Admiral”) but the relationship had broken down. He an Philadelphia were probably in a defacto relationship around 1800.
The couple had three children, Charlotte 1803, Thomas 1805 and James 1807.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of John Woodward:

In the colony, John married Sarah Dorset (Second Fleet Convict, 1790, “Lady Juliana”)
Sarah already had a child, Edward Dorset Powell, fathered by Edward Powell a sailor on the “Lady Juliana”.
John and Sarah had three children, James 1803, Jane 1805 and George 1807.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Eliza Whiston:

We can locate the couple in the 1822 Muster:
Davis, John, free by servitude, Cornwallis 7 years, landholder, Windsor
Whiston, Eliza, free by servitude, Minstrel, wife of J. Davis, Windsor
Whiston, child
Whiston, child
Winston, child.

And the 1825 Muster:
Davis, John, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, 7 years, landholder, Windsor.
Whiston, Eliza, Minstrel, 1812, life, wife of Thomas Miles, Windsor.
Whiston, Eliza, 10, born in the colony, daughter of above.
Whiston, Maria, 5, born in the colony, daughter of above.
# Note that here she is referred to as the wife of Thomas Miles!

In the 1828 Census: We can find them together and clearly see who the children belong to.
Sainty & Johnston; 1828 Census of New South Wales. 
Davis, John, 58, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, 7 years, Protestant, farmer, Pitt Town.
Davis, Maria, 6, born in the colony.
Davis, John, 4, born in the colony.
Wilson, Eliza, 31, free by servitude, Minstrel, 1812, 7 years, servant to John Davis, Pitt Town.
Miles, Eliza, 13, born in the colony, Protestant, at John Davis, Pitt Town.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Eliza Whiston:

In the colony, Eliza married Thomas Miles/Jones (Convict, 1798, “Barwell”). The couple had two children, Eliza Miles, 1814 and Ann Miles, 1817.
Then by about 1819, the relationship had broken up and she was with John Davis (Convict, 1801, “Earl Cornwallis”) and the couple had two children, Maria Davis 1820 and John Davis 1825.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Eliza Whiston:

(http://www.oldbaileyonline.org) t18110403-56
ELIZA WHISTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , three keys, value 6 d. and a sheet, value 4 s. the property of John Davis.
JOHN DAVIS. I am employed by the stationers of the bank of England, I live at No. 7, Bride’s passage. The prisoner had been my servant three months, she came with a recommendation, which happened to be a false one. On the 2nd of March, a little past one in the morning, I came home, I let myself in by a key, I observed a light in her bed-room, and thought she had gone to bed, and left the candle to the danger of the house; I knocked at the door twice, and called her by name, and received no answer. I looked over the curtain and saw a man sitting in a chair. One part of the shop is divided off, and the window looks into her bed room. I saw a man sitting in a chair, most terribly intoxicated; a a very rough and dirty looking fellow. I just touched his breast, and said, who are you, where did you come from, what do you do here; he repeated my words, and said, what do you do here; I will let you know about that, I replied. I went to the door, shut the street door, double locked it, and left the key in, and get two watchman; I left them in the house, I returned with two watchmen; the man was taken in custody; I called the prisoner, she came up out of the cellar. I told the watchman to take her in custody, they took her to St. Bride’s watchhouse. I gave charge of the man for being in my house at an unseasonable time, and as to her I could hardly tell what to say, I had lost a great deal of property, sheets, table linen, my shirts changed, others inferior placed for them. The constable searched her, there were found three keys and some duplicates. I had asked her prior to that concerning opening the drawers.
Q. Had you lost your keys - A. I had, and the three keys found upon her was mine, which she had positively denied ever seeing. I then asked her if she would give me up the accomplice I would take the linen home myself, which she refused.
Q. Among the duplicates that were found upon her was there any thing that turned out to be yours - A. One sheet, and that duplicate was found on her in my presence.
Q. Did she afterwards say any thing else on the subject - A. No, she took it with a deal of fortitude, and refused that clemency I had offered her.
Q. These keys that I had found upon her were yours - A. Yes, they are keys of a book case, and secretary, and a drawer that served as a wardrobe.
Q. Had she any business with these keys, or did you trust her with them - A. I never trusted her with them; I have never given her any key to open any place; I generally kept these keys in the buffet, or behind the book case.
JOSEPH BROWN . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse; I searched her, and found six duplicates, one was a duplicate for a sheet, pledged at Mr. Flemming’s, and these three keys I found upon her, before I searched her she denied having the keys, after I found them she said nothing, but seemed sorry they were found upon her.
JAMES DWELLY . I am a servant to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, in Fleet-market. I produce a sheet pawned by a woman on the 14th of February, I cannot identify the prisoner; I gave a duplicate to the person that pawned the sheet, and the duplicate now produced corresponds with the one on the sheet, it is my writing, and it is the counterpart. I lent half a crown upon it. The sheet is marked J. D. No. 6.
Prosecutor. The sheet is mine, it is my marking.
Q. On the 14th of February was the prisoner in your service - A. Yes, from the 13th of February, and two of the keys are certainly mine, one opens the wardrobe, and the other opens my book-case, and this key that I do not speak to opens a drawer in which I kept my iron chest.
Mr. Walford. Has not the prisoner been in the habit of buying articles for your house - A. No, I would not pay for a farthingsworth of matches; she has brought me one false bill, and a very bad account it is. I told her I would not pay any thing but milk and rolls.
Prisoner’s Defence. Upon account of having no mistress Mr. Davis gave me all the keys there was, that was four. The drawers were never locked all the time I was there; the sheets were kept up in the garret, I never was there but once, when the bricklayers were there.
GUILTY , aged 21.
Transported for Seven Years .
London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of John Davis:

In the colony, John had a defacto relationship with Eliza Whiston (Convict, 1812, “Minstrel”).
Eliza had been married to Thomas Miles (AKA Jones) (Convict, 1798, “Barwell”) and had three children but the relationship had evidently broken down around 1819. In 1820 she was with John and the couple had two children, Maria Davis 1820 and John Davis 1825.

We can locate the couple in the 1822 Muster:
Davis, John, free by servitude, Cornwallis 7 years, landholder, Windsor
Whiston, Eliza, free by servitude, Minstrel, wife of J. Davis, Windsor
Whiston, child
Whiston, child
Winston, child.

And the 1825 Muster:
Davis, John, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, 7 years, landholder, Windsor.
Whiston, Eliza, Minstrel, 1812, life, wife of Thomas Miles, Windsor.
Whiston, Eliza, 10, born in the colony, daughter of above.
Whiston, Maria, 5, born in the colony, daughter of above.
# Note that here she is referred to as the wife of Thomas Miles!

In the 1828 Census: We can find them together and clearly see who the children belong to.
Sainty & Johnston; 1828 Census of New South Wales. 
Davis, John, 58, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, 7 years, Protestant, farmer, Pitt Town.
Davis, Maria, 6, born in the colony.
Davis, John, 4, born in the colony.
Wilson, Eliza, 31, free by servitude, Minstrel, 1812, 7 years, servant to John Davis, Pitt Town.
Miles, Eliza, 13, born in the colony, Protestant, at John Davis, Pitt Town.

Denis Pember on 7th December, 2016 wrote of John Davis:

Is is quite difficult to ascertain which John Davis we are researching. There were three convicts named John Davis on the Earl Cornwallis which arrived 12th June 1801.
However, from the 1811 Muster records, we can locate John or Norfolk island [Ref 1521 page 34] This gives his trial details clearly as April 1798, Old Bailey.

John was tried in three separate trials on 18th April 1798. All involve Animal theft and were carried out in the company of the same two men…

(http://www.oldbaileyonline.org) t17980418-55
JAMES SHARP , JOHN DAVIS , and JAMES HINDES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a live tame cock, value 2s. seven live tame hens, value 12s. and a live tame rabbit, value 3s. the property of Henry Whitefield , D.D.(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)  .... the case was then presented…
Sharp, GUILTY (Aged 58.)
Davis, GUILTY (Aged 18.)
Hindes, NOT GUILTY .
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.
NEXT.. t17980418-56
JAMES SHARP , JOHN DAVIS , and JAMES HINDES , were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February, a live tame cock, value 2s. and six live tame hens, value 12s. the property of John Baker .
All three NOT GUILTY .
Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.
NEXT.. t17980418-57
JAMES SHARP , JOHN DAVIS ; and JAMES HINDES , were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a live tame cock, value 2s. six live tame hens, value 12s. and four live tame ducks, value 7s. the property of William Sherborne.
.... again the evidence is presented….
All three GUILTY .
Transported for seven years .
Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Robin Sharkey on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Margaret Wilson:

Margaret Wilson was transported on “Royal Admiral” arriving October 1792 after being tried at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, on 11 Jan 1792. Appears to have been convicted at Newcastle, but was to be held at Morpeth, Northumberland County (?)

DIED in Sydney in October 1794. (probably 11th or 12th)
BURIED on 12th October 1794,  at the Old Sydney Burial Ground (City of Sydney Archive records)

She died in Sydney on Buried 12 Oct 1794

Kristy Hayward on 7th December, 2016 wrote of Michael (the Younger) Hayward:

A native of Sussex, England, Michael was tried on the 13.07.1826. After serving his sentence Michael was granted a Certificate of Freedom on the 30th August 1833.He married Sarah Ellison/Elleson on the 8th July 1844 at St Johns Anglican Church Parramatta. Michael Hayward/Haywood died 6.12.1871 at Brushgrove, South Arm, Clarence River from a Paralysis which he endured for 8 years, he is buried at Rocky Mouth, Clarence River, New South Wales.

Robin Sharkey on 6th December, 2016 wrote of Mary Graham:

MARY GRAHAM was tried at the Old Bailey in July 1791 for stealing 2 silver tablespoons on the 14th of June valued at 20 s. the property of James Hamilton , Esq; the Earl of Clanbrassil in the kingdom of Ireland. He lived at Stanhope STReet, Mayfair.

Mary Graham had been at the house of Lord Clan Brassil on the evening of 13th June for about half an hour with a petition to Lady Clanbrassil

Lord Clanbrassil’s valet, James Asplin gave the following evidence:

“JAMES ASPLIN sworn.
I am valet to Lord Clanbrassil; I have seen the prisoner two or three times; on Tuesday she came; she related a very melancholy tale of herself; I told her I was excessively sorry; but, if she would call in the middle of the day, her Ladyship would relieve her.”

Perhaps the valet meant Monday, 13th June, not Tuesday.

Th footman said she appeared at the house on Monday 13th June about 9:30 in the morning and enquired for Mr Asplin. The footman “went down to call him”, the dining parlour,which was open, being on the left hand side of the street door. 

The footman let her in again at half past twelve that Monday 13th, presumably she turned up again just as the valet had suggested , in the middle of the day.  The footman and gave the following evidence “ … she asked if my Lady was within, and said a person of the name of Graham came for an answer to a petition; I said I would go and let her know, she was in her dressing-room; I went to tell her; and Lady Clanbrassil said she had written to Lady Hillsborough to inquire [Graham’s] character, and Lady Hillsborough sent answer she knew little of her, and she sent her down half-a-crown”.  It was about nine or ten minutes while he went upstairs and left mary Graham waiting downstairs.

Another servant gave evidence that he missed five silver spoons on Tuesday 14th June as he was going to lay the cloth.
Mary Graham took silver spoons to a silversmith that evening about five o’clock, with the crest of Lord Clanbrassil on them, offering to sell them. He asked her what she wanted t-for them bt she told him to weigh them.  The silversmith did not know the crest, and asked whose it was, whether it was her crest.  “She told me that she got them from the Marchioness of Buckingham; that she was a distant relation to her Ladyship, and received them as presents from her”.

Then the silversmith did this, as he obviously suspected her
“I asked her where she lived, and she gave me a right direction where she lived, in Little St. James’s-street; I asked her if she had any objection to my going with her to her lodgings; she said she had not; I said I would go with her; instead of which, I went out at the back door, and went to the place where she said she lodged, and inquired and found she did live there; and about six or seven days after, I found out to whom those spoons belonged; I went to the Earl of Clanbrassil’s house with the spoons, and shewed them to the servant that opened the door.”

There was an objection on the face of her indictment, because it was made out that the spoons were the property of James Hamilton Esq (whcih was Lord Clanbrassil’s name) when it should have been made out that they were the property of the Earl of Clanbrassil.

The judge told her that “however slight it may be, you ought to have, and you shall have, the benefit of it; therefore no sentence must be passed upon you till the next session, and then you will know the opinion of the Judges.”

So no decision was yet made, and she had to come back to he Court on 7th December. Presumably all that time she was languishing in Newgate Prison.

On 7th December, Mr. Baron PERRYN delivered the OPINION of the TWELVE JUDGES on her Case, which was reserved for their Decision:

“ …I believe eleven of the Judges attended, and they were all unanimously of opinion; the question being, Whether the prosecutor was properly described in this indictment or not? they were all of opinion that the description was proper, that it was laid in proper form.” He then went on to cite legal authorities for this. The basic resolution was that no “dignity of Ireland” i.e title Can give a man a higher title here than that of Esquire.

She was sentenced to 7 years’ transportation.

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette - Thursday 17 May 1792 page 2:
“Friday, 54 transports, of whom five were women, were removed from Newgate on board a Lighter, to be conveyed to the Royal Admiral, lying at Gravesend, and bound for Botany Bay.
“It is hoped the above transports may be useful hands in the whale fishery of New South Wales.

Robin Sharkey on 6th December, 2016 wrote of Elizabeth Terry:

Elizabeth Terry, Aged: 15 years tried at the Old Bailey on 29 Mar 1792.
She was sentenced to 7 years and arrived per Royal Admiral on 07 Oct 1792, at Sydney .
Reportedly on the indents she was “Married”.

Old Bailey Trial
William Rounding kept a public-house , the Dover-castle; Green-stairs, Rotherhithe and ELizabeth Terry was his servant.  On the 7th of March, in the morning, about six, she was gone; I pursued her to Petty-France; she was found; I saw her in custody; and the things in the indictment, which were lost, were found upon her by Sarah Kirkman.

The stolen things were - one silk gown, one silk bonnet, 2 pr stockings, one calico shawl, one calico gown, two muslin aprons,

Sarah Kirkman (whose position was not identified) said “she came to me on Monday morning, at half past seven, to ask for Elizabeth Mitchell; she was out of breath, a bundle in her hand, and a bonnet loose, and no hat or cloak on”. This woman said she was present at the finding the goods as she “stopped the goods on the prisoner, and sent for a constable”.  Elizabeth Terry told this woman the goods were her won, and Kirkman kept them ever since until the trial 22 days later.

Elizabeth called two witnesses to her character.
She was sentenced to be transported seven years.

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette - Thursday 17 May 1792 page 2:
“Friday, 54 transports, of whom five were women, were removed from Newgate on board a Lighter, to be conveyed to the Royal Admiral, lying at Gravesend, and bound for Botany Bay.”

Four of these five women taken out of Newgate for the Royal Admiral were: Harriet Wray,  Mary Graham, Elizabeth Powell and Elizabeth Terry. All were young women - Harriett 17, Elizabeth Terry only 15 and married, Elizabeth Powell 19 and married, and Mary Graham aged 27.

Robin Sharkey on 6th December, 2016 wrote of Elizabeth Powell:

ELIZABETH POWELL WAS aged 19 years. She was tried on 26 Oct 1791 at the Old baiey for stealing a silver watch off a man on the street.

Cornelius Courtney was teh prosecutor and he said “I am a gardener ; on Sunday, the 16th, I was going up Hedge-lane , I was accosted by the prisoner at the bar; she put her hand into mine, and asked for some gin; ”  It was the usual style of hustle with several girls accosting him, and taking what they could find off him. Elizabeth and he had a tussle over the watch and it broke off its chain and fell in teh ground.  She took it up. The constablte came up and secured her.

Elizabeth’s version:
“On Sunday evening as I was coming up Hedge-lane, with tobacco in my hand, this gentleman was calling out watch, and said he had lost his watch. The constable’s nephew found the watch. The man put his hand into my bosom, and seized me, he said I was the person who robbed him.”

She was sentenced to death but on 19 February 1792 was reprieved to a life sentence. She was transported on “Royal Admiral” departing in May 1792 and arriving in NSW on 7 October 1792.
The indents recorded her as Married.

REPRIEVED:
Kentish Gazette Tuesday 10 April 1792 p3
Wednesday, the Recorder made his report to the King in Council of the Prisoners in Newgate capitally convicted in January and February Sessions, when the two following were ordered to be executed on Wednesday next, viz
Twenty were reprieved during pleasure.

HEADING TO THE CONVICT SHIP
Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette - Thursday 17 May 1792 page 2:
“Friday, 54 transports, of whom five were women, were removed from Newgate on board a Lighter, to be conveyed to the Royal Admiral, lying at Gravesend, and bound for Botany Bay.
“It is hoped the above transports may be useful hands in the whale fishery of New South Wales.

Four of the five women taken out of Newgate for the Royal Admiral were: Harriet Wray,  Mary Graham, Elizabeth Powell and Elizabeth Terry. All were young women - Harriett 17, Elizabeth Terry only 15 and married, Elizabeth Powell 19 and married, and Mary Graham aged 27.

1805, 9th October - MARRIAGE to William Etsell,/ Excell (per “Albermalre 1791)
Abode: Hawkesbury. William made his mark; & Elizabeth Moles, Abode: Hawkesbury Signed properly;
Married at the Hawkesbury, but registered at St Johns Church of England Parramatta by Samuel Marsden; Witness: Thomas White, Signed; Witness: Jane Noel, Signed

Elizabeth and William Excell remained together.

1806 He rented land from “Widow Moseley” - 30 acres, Cultivated, 2 bushels wheat 2 bushels barley held / 4 male hogs 4 female hogs; one employed free man.

1810 - Settler at Hawkesbury
1814 -she was free and mustered at Windsor

She received a Conditional Pardon.
1822 - William was a Lease Resident; Total: 9 acres, Cleared: 9 acres, Cultivated, Windsor.

In 1828 she was recorded as Catholic, and living on the Windsor Rd at Baulkham Hill sith her husband William “Etsell” .  Supposedly her age was 74, however based on being 19 in 1792 she would be 56 years old.

William Etsell, Age: 54, Catholic, Arrived per Albemarle 1791, 7 years, Free by Servitude; Labourer; Property: Etsell’s Farm

Robin Sharkey on 6th December, 2016 wrote of Harriot Wray:

Four of the five women taken out of Newgate for the Royal Admiral were: Harriet Wray,  Mary Graham, Elizabeth Powell and Elizabeth Terry. All were young women - Harriett 17, Elizabeth Terry only 15 and married, Elizabeth Powell 19 and married, and Mary Graham aged 27.

Robin Sharkey on 6th December, 2016 wrote of Harriot Wray:

Harriet Wray was transported on “Royal Admiral’ convict ship arriving October 1792.  She was 17 years old. Tried at the Old bailey on 28 March 1792 for assaulting a man in the street and stealing his watch.

Harriet Wray was probably a prostitute. The evidence from the Old Bailey was that she was obviously destitute, and at the age of 17 had claimed she already had two children. Her poverty was so extreme that she had no money to pay for a bed in a lodging house (which were very cheap anyway), that after several days she had not eaten for two days, hat even the lodging house keeper took pity on her, loaned her 2 shillings and allowed her to sleep, and that the Bow St runner who found her to arrest her said in evidence that she was “in a deplorable state”.  Poor Harriet.

During the day of the events that got her transported, Sunday 11th march 1792, she was looking for a lodging and approached Ann Smith, a keeper of a lodging-house at 7 Cockpit Alley, off Drury Lane.  Ann Smith told her she couldn’t trust her (i.e. to pay for the lodging) so Harriet said she would pawn something on Monday morning, the next day.

That night Harriet was out on Great Russell Street as was a tailor named Lawrence Goodwin who had been to dinner in Stanhope Street with a friend, drinking freely. There were two versions of what happened next:
Lawrence Goodwin admitted in evidence that had seen Harriet several times before in Russel-Street, but had never spoke to her; that she might have asked him for something to drink. He claimed that at about eight o’clock on the Sunday night he came across Harriet together with two other girls, that they rumbled him on Great Russell Street and stole items from him - his hat, neckcloth and pocket handkerchief,  a pair of gloves, penknife and monies, but most valuably, his silver watch. He claimed Harriet laid hold of him first and that it was definitely Harriet who took his watch. He claimed he laid hold of Harriet and then one of the other girls came and stuck her nails into his hand; that also Harriet had fast hold of him by the breast, and that the girls threw him down off the pavement and ran off.

Harriet claimed in her defence that Lawrence Goodwin “was very much in liquor”, that he asked her to take him home (for sex) but that when they got there he said he was a married man and known in the neighbourhood and so did not like to go upstairs. Instead he gave her 3s 6d “to have connections in the passage”. By implication, this is what then happened, because Harriet claimed that “when she went to go” [out of the passageway] she kicked something and on stooping to pick it up found it was a watch.

True to her word, Harriet gave the watch the next morning to Ann Smith to pawn as security for her board at the lodging house, asking Smith to pawn it for one guinea.  She told Ann Smith she had two children by a young man and that it was he who owned the watch (the claim of the two children may have been untrue). Smith took the watch to Collins the pawn-broker in Wild Street. On the Thursday, Harriet went back to Ann Smith’s telling her she had not eaten for two days and Ann Smith took pity on her, lent her two shillings and let her go to bed. It was then that Harriet let her have a duplicate of the watch. Ann Smith then pawned this duplicate to a different pawnbroker - Richard Rozell.  Clearly, Smith was canny and was not going back to the same pawnbroker.

Lawrence Goodwin went to the Bow Street officers and complained of robbery, obviously identifying Harriet Wray. However, he must not have complained for some days because Harriet was at least at Ann Smith’s, sleeping, the next Thursday.  No evidence is reported about this delay.  Roger Gastrell, one of the Bow St runners gave evidence that “I went after the girl, “AND FOUND HER IN A DEPLORABLE STATE” (emphasis added); she said, you are come about the watch; I told her she had better tell the truth: she said the watch was pawned in Wild-street, at Collins’s”

Harriet Wray was found guilty of stealing only, but not of stealing violently from the person as charged, as this would have brought the death sentence.

She was sentenced instead to seven years’ transportation.
Kentish Gazette Tuesday 10 April 1792 p3
Wednesday, the Recorder made his report to the King in Council of the Prisoners in Newgate capitally convicted in January and February Sessions, when the two following were ordered to be executed on Wednesday next, viz
Twenty were reprieved during pleasure.
… SO HARRIET WRAY WAS NOT YET REPRIEVED.

Taken by Lighter up the Thames to the convict chip:

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette - Thursday 17 May 1792 page 2:
“Friday, 54 transports, of whom five were women, were removed from Newgate on board a Lighter, to be conveyed to the Royal Admiral, lying at Gravesend, and bound for Botany Bay.
“It is hoped the above transports may be useful hands in the whale fishery of New South Wales.”

June 1801 - was living on Norfolk Island. Her own sentence should have expired and she should have been free. 26 June 1801 Was witness to marriage of William Hutchinson (per ‘Hillsborough’) to Mary Cooper alias Chapman (per ‘Brittannia 1798). Name recorded as Harriet “Ray”.

2 April 1802 - Departed Norfolk Island
24 July 1802 - returned to Norfolk island, free woman sentence expired. Re-victualed as a free woman
1805 Muster, listed as convict on stores, Norfolk Island

DIED 3 December 1807, Norfolk Island.

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