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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of James Weavers:

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Ref P1087 page 304]....
Porter, Richard, 62, absolute pardon, Surprize, 1790. life, Protestant, settler, Kissing Point.
Porter, Mary, 62, free by servitude, Mary Ann, 1791, 7 years, Protestant.
Porter, Richard (Jun), 23, born in the colony.
## Richard Junior the step-son, was unmarried at this stage, he later married Ellen Fitzgerald the daughter of Michael Fitzgerald (Irish Convict, 1806, “Tellicherry”) and Bridget Shea (Irish Convict, 1806 “Tellicherry”).
Also on the Census are:
[Ref O0292 page 292] The step-daughter Mary Anne now married to Peter Honslow (Convict, 1798, “Globe”).
[Ref W0833 page 386] The daughter from Mary’s first marriage, with James, now married to Robert Wicks (Convict, 1802, “Perseus”).
## All these children had quite large families.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of James Weavers:

Mary, now a widow with three or four children aged between 10 and 3 now moved to live with her step-father, Richard Porter.  They then commenced a de-facto relationship, had several children and subsequently married 8th June 1811.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of James Weavers:

James burial was registered at St Philips, Sydney on 4th April 1805.  His Mother-in-Law, Ann Porter, was buried the day before, 3rd April 1805.  There are no substantiated records as to the rumour that each of these was killed by Aboriginal incursion onto their properties. There is no record located in the Sydney press regarding the matter.  However, there were numerous such attcks taking place in the Hawkesbury during this period. In 1820, his son, Enoch Weavers, submitted a petition for a land grant on the basis that the land grant to his father had been lost. A referee, Mr John Piper, made the following statement….
“This lad, being a native of this place and his father having been killed by the Natives, I beg you to support his petition”
[Ref Flynn, Michael; The Second Fleet: page 600]

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of James Weavers:

By January 1792, James was already settled on a 30 acre property which was granted to him in February.  It would seem that he was already living with Mary Hutchinson (Convict, 1791, “Mary Ann”) and the couple married in 1792. By 1800, they were moderately prosperous with 6 acres of wheat, 6 of maize, 17 sheep, 14 pigs and a goat. By 1802 the whole family, including three children, had moved off government stores and were self sufficient. By then, the sheep flock had increased to 51 he was then purchasing further land.
Nearby, lived Mary’s mother Ann Hutchinson (Convict, 1791, “Mary Ann”) and her much younger husband Richard Porter (Convict, 1790, “Surprize”).  Richard had been a transportee on the same vessel as James.  Ann and Maryt had been convicted together and now lived very near to each other.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of James Weavers:

Flynn, Michael; The Second Fleet.. Page 599…
James Weavers was sentenced to death at 28 March 1787 Bury St Edmunds (Suffolk) Assizes for the burglary on the night of 1 November 1786 of the widow Charlotte Hunt’s house at Needham Market.  He was reprieved soon afterwards to transportation for life and was maintained by the county in gaol until 24 July 1788.  On 8 September 1789 he was embarked on HMS “Guardian”.  It was stated that he had farming experience and was one of a group of 25 specially selected convicts whose skills were needed in New South Wales.
He survived the near sinking of “Guardian” when it was holed by an iceberg of the Cape and was then transferred to “Surprize” with 19 other surviving convicts.  He was recommended for a conditional pardon for his role in saving the “Guardian” from sinking.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Richard Porter:

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Ref P1087 page 304]....
Porter, Richard, 62, absolute pardon, Surprize, 1790. life, Protestant, settler, Kissing Point.
Porter, Mary, 62, free by servitude, Mary Ann, 1791, 7 years, Protestant.
Porter, Richard (Jun), 23, born in the colony.
## Richard Junior was unmarried at this stage, he later married Ellen Fitzgerald the daughter of Michael Fitzgerald (Irish Convict, 1806, “Tellicherry”) and Bridget Shea (Irish Convict, 1806 “Tellicherry”).
Also on the Census are:
[Ref O0292 page 292] The daughter Mary Anne now married to Peter Honslow (Convict, 1798, “Globe”).
[Ref W0833 page 386] The step-daughter from Mary’s first marriage, now married to Robert Wicks (Convict, 1802, “Perseus”).
## All these children had quite large families.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Richard Porter:

The daughter-in-law, Mary, now a widow with three or four children aged between 10 and 3 now moved to live with her step-father, Richard Porter.  They then commenced a de-facto relationship, had several children and subsequently married 8th June 1811.
Richard Porter therefore actually married both the mother and her daughter.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Richard Porter:

Ann’s burial was registered at St Philips, Sydney on 3rd April 1805.  Her son-in-Law, James Weavers, was buried the day after, 4th April 1805.  There are no substantiated records as to the rumour that each of these was killed by Aboriginal incursion onto their properties. There is no record located in the Sydney press regarding the matter.  However, there were numerous such attcks taking place in the Hawkesbury during this period. In 1820, her grandson, Enoch Weavers, the son of James and Mary, submitted a petition for a land grant on the basis that the land grant to his father had been lost. A referee, Mr John Piper, made the following statement….
“This lad, being a native of this place and his father having been killed by the Natives, I beg you to support his petition”
[Ref Flynn, Michael; The Second Fleet: page 600]

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Richard Porter:

On October 8th 1797, Richard married Ann Hutchinson (Convict, 1791, “Mary Ann”).  Ann was a much older woman and the couple did not have children. Ann’s daughter Mary (Convict, 1791, “Mary Ann”) had been convicted with Ann and had married James Weavers (Convict, 1790, “Surprize”). The two couples lived on properties in the Kissing Point area and by 1800 were doing very well.  The 1800-1802 muster shows them each on 30 acre grants with cultivation and livestock.

Mary Walters on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Reuben Barham:

Married Mary Ann Bailey (aka Ann Mary Bilsborough) in Launceston on 9/6/1866.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Richard Porter:

Flynn, Michael; The Second Fleet… Page 482..
Richard Porter, aged 23, was sentenced to death at the March 1789 Nottingham Assizes for the burglary of Henry Stubley’s house at Mallin Hill, Nottingham, the previous October in which a silver watch and items of clothing were stolen.
The local newspaper reported that : “in a pathetic speech the judge, setting forth the enormity of his crime, and advising him by a true and sincere repentence to make the best use of the short time he had left”.
The following month he was reprieved and then sent to London for embarkation on the “Surprize”.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Mary Hutchinson:

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Ref P1088 page 304]....
Porter, Richard, 62, absolute pardon, Surprize, 1790. life, Protestant, settler, Kissing Point.
Porter, Mary, 62, free by servitude, Mary Ann, 1791, 7 years, Protestant.
Porter, Richard (Jun), 23, born in the colony.
## Richard Junior was unmarried at this stage, he later married Ellen Fitzgerald the daughter of Michael Fitzgerald (Irish Convict, 1806, “Tellicherry”) and Bridget Shea (Irish Convict, 1806 “Tellicherry”).
Also on the Census are:
[Ref O0292 page 292] The daughter Mary Anne now married to Peter Honslow (Convict, 1798, “Globe”).
[Ref W0833 page 386] The daughter from Mary’s first marriage, now married to Robert Wicks (Convict, 1802, “Perseus”).
## All these children had quite large families.

D Wong on 25th March, 2017 wrote of John Wall:

John Wall was listed as 15 years old on arrival.  He was born in Hampstead Road C1820.

John was 4’4” tall, freckled face, black hair, brown eyes.

Occupation: Labourer and Tailor 2 years.

Originally sent to Point Puer then listed as at Port Arthur.

15/7/1840: Free Certificate.

D Wong on 25th March, 2017 wrote of William Trinder:

3/2/1844 Gloucestershire Chronicle Gloucestershire, England:
William Trinder and Thomas Gregory, charged with stealing bacon Cheltenham, the property of Henry Camps.

William Trinder was 18 years old on arrival in VDL. It was his 3rd conviction.  He was born at Cheltenham.

William was 5’5” tall, brown hair, blue eyes, 5 blue dots on left arm below elbow, faint blue mark on back of left hand. Ring {in} 2nd finger left hand, single, literate, protestant.

No date of death found - references to a William Trinder at Ballarat in the 1850’s on ‘Trove’.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Mary Hutchinson:

Mary, now a widow with three or four children aged between 10 and 3 now moved to live with her step-father, Richard Porter.  They commenced a de-facto relationship, had several children and subsequently married 8th June 1811.
Richard Porter therefore married the mother and her daughter.

Denis Pember on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Mary Hutchinson:

Mary and James had several children and seemed to be doing very well. In the 1802 Muster, james is holding 30 acres at Kissing Point and has a number of sheep and pigs as well as cultivation on his land.  His property is adjacent to that of Richard Porter and Ann Hutchinson.

Then James burial was registered at St Philips, Sydney on 4th April 1805.  His mother-in-Law, Ann Porter, was buried the day before, 3rd April 1805.  There are no substantiated records as to the rumour that each of these was killed by Aboriginal incursion onto their properties. There is no record located in the Sydney press regarding the matter.  However, there were numerous such attcks taking place in the Hawkesbury during this period. In 1820, his son, Enoch Weavers, submitted a petition for a land grant on the basis that the land grant to his father had been lost. A referee, Mr John Piper, made the following statement….
“This lad, being a native of this place and his father having been killed by the Natives, I beg you to support his petition”
[Ref Flynn, Michael; The Second Fleet: page 600]

Raine Biancalt on 25th March, 2017 wrote of Catherine Blakeney:

Catherine Blakeney (nee Lawn). m.1 John Blakeney with whom she was convicted. JB sent to NSW, CB sent to VDL. Married ex-convict Phillip Pembrey. Two daughters Sarah b.1833, Mary Ann b.1834. Moved to Mount Gambier area.

Deb on 25th March, 2017 wrote of John Wall:

John Wall aged 12 convicted of stealing 2 silver spoons and 1 flatiron from George and Martha Warne. George was a professor of music and was blind.

D Wong on 24th March, 2017 wrote of Rose Monaghan:

15/5/1899 The Mercury, Hobart:
BATES.—On Sunday, May 14, 1899, at Hobart, Rosannah, the beloved wife of Joseph Bates, in the 72nd year of her age. R.I.P. Friends are invited to attend her funeral, which will leave her late residence, Sackville-street, THIS DAY (MONDAY), at half-past 2, for Cornelian Bay Cemetery.

D Wong on 24th March, 2017 wrote of Rose Monaghan:

National Records of Scotland:
Precognition against Mary Monteith, Rose Monaghan, Ann Duffen, Mary Robertson, Mary Murray for the crime of assault and robbery, and theft, habit and repute, and previous conviction
Dates 1849

Accused Mary Monteith, Age: 20, Address: Taylor’s Close, Greenock, with Elizabeth Blaney or Campbell

Rose Monaghan, Age: 20, Address: Taylor’s Close, Greenock, with Elizabeth Blaney

Ann Duffen, Age: 17, Address: Taylor’s Close, Greenock, with Elizabeth Blaney or Campbell, Origin: Native of Paisley

Mary Robertson, Age: 17, Address: Taylor’s Close, Greenock, with Elizabeth Blaney or Campbell, Origin: Native of Paisley

Mary Murray, Age: 22, Address: Taylor’s Close, Greenock, with Mary Monteith

All were found guilty and transported for 7 years.
All were on the Baretto Junior.

Rose Monaghan was 23 years old on arrival.  She was born at Ayr, Scotland.

Rose had previous convictions for stealing and drunkenness.  She was 5’2” tall, brown hair, hazel eyes, mole left side of nose, reads, single, on the town for 18 months.

18/6/1855: Married Joseph Bates (Nile 1850) at St Georges, Hobart - he was 27 and Rose 26.
Children:
Joseph 23/1/1858
John 14/10/1860 - died 8/3/1873, aged 13, Buried at Cornelian Bay Cemetery.
William Alfred 12/6/1863
Henry 12/8/1865
Caroline 16/6/1867
Thomas 17/6/1869
James 6/6/1872 - died 27/1/1875 at Lansdowne Crescent, Hobart, aged 3, Laborer’s child, delicate health, Chronic diarrhea, Exhaustion.

14/5/1899: Rose died 14/5/1899 at Hobart (Listed as Rosannah).

D Wong on 24th March, 2017 wrote of John Harborne:

John Harborne was 16 years old when convicted of ‘Burglary’, he was sentenced to be hanged on 2/8/1827. Commuted to transportation for life.

John was the son of William Harborne and Sarah Taylor. He was 5’6 3/4” tall, fair ruddy complexion, fair hair, blue eyes, Scar under left eyebrow, mermaid on right arm, anchor, morn and stars (illegible- 4 letters of the alphabet, perhaps THPH) on left arm, scar on right side of neck,

1828 Census: Harborn, John, 17, government servant, C. Harcourt, 1828, life, Protestant, labourer to James Chilcott of Patricks Plains.

29/6/1838: TOL Patrick Plains

C1843: John had a relationship with Alice Clarke - Alice’s husband Edwin Baldwin had been convicted in 1831 for cattle stealing, he was sent to Norfolk Island.  On his return to NSW at the end of the 1830’s he found that Alice had given birth to at least two children by other men. Alice’s relationship with John began in the early to mid 1840s was de facto - Alice remained married to Edwin Baldwin until her death.

2/3/1846: CP

15/3/1865: Married Elizabeth Sleath at Warkworth, Hunter, NSW. (at St. Philips Church Warkworth,
John Harborne a bachelor and farmer of Warkworth and Elizabeth Sleath a farmer’s daughter and spinster of Warkworth. Dated 15 March 1865. Witnesses Valentine Heaton and Ann Heaton who made her X mark. John and Elizabeth signed the register. They had 7 children.

9/4/1882: John died at Singleton, NSW aged 70.
Information from his death certificate:
Died 9 Apr 1882 at Wambo near Singleton, John Harborne a farmer aged 70, cause of death abscess in leg and debility 6 months, parents William Harborne, occupation unknown and Sarah Taylor. Informant J. Harborne, son of Wambo near Singleton.
Born Birmingham England, 53 years in NSW
Married at Warkworth at age 53 to Elizabeth Sleath
Children of marriage: William 14, James 12, Charles 10, Julia 7, Edward 1 year and 5 months, one male and one female deceased.
Informant: J. Harborne, son of Wambo near Singleton.

Denis Pember on 24th March, 2017 wrote of Ann Hutchison:

Ann’s daughter, Mary, now a widow with three or four children aged between 10 and 3 now moved to live with her step-father, Richard Porter.  They commenced a de-facto relationship, had several children and subsequently married 8th June 1811.

Denis Pember on 24th March, 2017 wrote of Ann Hutchison:

Ann’s burial was registered at St Philips, Sydney on 3rd April 1805.  Her son-in-Law, James Weavers, was buried the day after, 4th April 1805.  There are no substantiated records as to the rumour that each of these was killed by Aboriginal incursion onto their properties. There is no record located in the Sydney press regarding the matter.  However, there were numerous such attcks taking place in the Hawkesbury during this period. In 1820, her grandson, Enoch Weavers, the son of James and Mary, submitted a petition for a land grant on the basis that the land grant to his father had been lost. A referee, Mr John Piper, made the following statement….
“This lad, being a native of this place and his father having been killed by the Natives, I beg you to support his petition”
[Ref Flynn, Michael; The Second Fleet: page 600]

Christine Edney on 24th March, 2017 wrote of Sarah Guest:

2 children Catherine b 7 Oct 1792 at Parramatta who married John Bottle at Parramatta on 26 Sept 1808 and John b Dec 1794 at Hawkesbury.

Christine Edney on 24th March, 2017 wrote of John Soare:

stole clothes at Spread Eagle Inn derby. sentenced 16/4/1791. 2 & half yrs on hulk Ceres. worked on building Cumberland Fort. md Sarah Guest ( arr Mary Ann 9/7/1791)on 25 /9/1791. 2 children Catherine b 7/10/1792 md John Bottle 1808. John b 12/1794. granted 30 ac at South Ck nr windsor . was pt time constable.

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